Goldsmiths Anthropology research >< practice seminar series – 'Technologies of friendship'

research >< practice seminar series

Next 9 Nov 2016 from 4-6pm, I will be sharing bits and pieces of my recent ethnographic work and reflections at the Goldsmiths Anthropology  research >< practice seminar series at RHB 256, Richard Hoggart Building

This seminar series explores the currency of practice research within and without anthropology. It will unpack some of the ways in which the relationship between these two “modes of engagement” has been understood and articulated, from militancy to co-design, from enskillment to collaborative art projects. Drawing from their first-hand experience in the field, the speakers will consider the epistemological challenges and opportunities of practice-led and practice-based research (as well as research-led practice).

Moderator and Organiser: Dr Isaac Marrero-Guillamon

‘Technologies of friendship’: Independent-living activism, open design and the refiguration of the social and the ethnographic

What stories–and more specifically ethnographic stories–would open design allow us to tell? Whereas open design is commonly associated with a multifarious transformation of knowledge-production and economic practices in and around design, in this presentation I will focus on their effect on the practice of ethnography and on the materialisation of forms of relatedness. To do this, I will draw from my engagement since 2012 as ethnographer/documentator in the Barcelona-based activist design collective En torno a la silla (ETS), whose primary principle–resonating with other aspects of the independent-living movement it is part of–is to grant value to experience as a form of knowledge to be used in processes of collaborative alteration of our material surroundings, engaging in the auto-fabrication of open design objects. Operating in a harsh context of austerity measures, fighting for accessibility for ETS has always implied reclaiming the necessary material means to increase the conditions of access between bodily diverse people. Hence, the interest is not to create ‘inclusive objects’–that seek to ‘integrate’ or, rather, open up the gates of an already existing community to those who had been formerly expelled from it–but to produce what they have usually referred to as ‘technologies of friendship’ (tecnologías de la amistad): this term does not bring to the fore a distinctive and static ontology of relations, but thanks to the reflexivity afforded by the investment in documentation, it signals a recursive interstitial form of probing into alternative material forms of relatedness to the ones offered by the state and the market.

MCTS, TU Munich – Research Colloquium: ‘Tinkering with care’

Tutorial rampa portátil, En torno a la silla CC BY NC SA 2015

On Tuesday, 25 Oct 2016, Dr. Tomás S. Criado (MCTS) will give a talk on “Tinkering with care: Austere experiments with alternative welfare infrastructures” at the MCTS (TU Munich) Research Colloquium.

The event will take place at MCTS, Augustenstr. 46, seminar room 270 and start at 5:00 pm.

The MCTS Research Colloquium is designed to present recent Science and Technology Studies projects as well as to stimulate discussion on the various research activities by MCTS scholars and their guests.

**

Abstract for the talk

Once considered the primary institutional expression of care in the global North, the Welfare State and its infrastructures are now under great strains. Apart from neoliberal attempts at streamlining ‘the social’, different versions of Welfare across Europe have also been contested by disability rights movements due to their articulation around ‘dependence’. In this presentation, I will show a particular set of experiments at tinkering with such articulations of care and citizenship in particularly ‘austere’ times. Indeed, I will reflect on the practices I have been studying ethnographically in the past years in Spain, involving activist self-management or auto-fabrication of self-care devices by independent-living collectives. This is a response to both recent legal developments, the inadequacy of standardized market products, the increasing lack of funds, and the cracks in the public services, such as the system of provision of technical aids–a particular care regime I will generically refer to as ‘the catalogue’. As part of my involvement with different collectives tinkering, in their own idiom, with care arrangements, I will narrate the collaborative design practices and the strategies of different independent-living activists and engaged professionals attempting to bring into existence alternative and more caring forms of envisioning, materializing and valuing these arrangements. In sheer contrast with the state/corporate expert-based ‘catalogue’ of products and services, tinkering with care for these groups entails engaging in austere and fragile self-experimental design practices where alternative epistemic, economic and political ‘regimes of co-production’ (experience-based, collaborative, and self-produced) are tested and demonstrated. In describing this, I will not only try to ethnographically take issue with the understandings of welfare ‘otherwise’ they bring to the fore, but also with how they might help us address, in a more vernacular light, the different notions of care being developed recently in STS.

ICS, ULisboa – Visiting Researcher seminar: ‘Give Us an Institute and We Will Raise an Accessible Barcelona’

Give Us an Institute and We Will Raise an Accessible Barcelona

Next week I will be giving a Visiting Researcher seminar at the ICS-ULisboa

Organized by Dr. Ana DelicadoResearch group ‘Environment, Territory and Society’

**

Give Us an Institute and We Will Raise an Accessible Barcelona

12 October 2016 14.30h – 16.30h

Sala 2, ICS-ULisboa

This presentation reports on ethnographic and archival work undertaken in 2014 and 2016 at a very small and peripheral institute, part of Barcelona’s City Hall, the Institut Municipal de Persones amb Discapacitat (IMPD): enforcing and supervising the city-wide planning and implementation of accessible urban and transport infrastructures. Allegedly, the IMPD has been crucial for Barcelona’s huge transformation into one of the most accessible cities in the world. Officially founded in 1990–merging disability-specific management units (patronats) that emerged after the disability rights struggles in the late 1970s–this institute’s main objective has been that of offering a way for disabled people to take part in the city’s planning. Indeed, the IMPD’s council is jointly managed by civil servants–mostly social workers–and disabled people’s representatives elected every 4 years. But how could such a small entity have a lasting impact on a huge and extremely complex municipal structure? And how, in doing so, could it grant the ‘material expression’ of accessibility rights for its most vulnerable citizens?

In this presentation I will seek to explain this paying particular attention to the ‘documentary interfaces’ put together to articulate interesting relationships between the technicians and the accessibility advocates. To be more specific, not only will I seek to report on (a) on the role of topic-specific ‘commissions of participation’, where experiential and embodied knowledge from the disabled is documented and brought together to sensitize the architects and engineers in charge of implementing wider municipal projects; but also on other ‘smaller interventions’, such as: (b) its regular publications, sensitization campaigns and outreach leaflets; and (c) the work of its technicians, constantly supervising and writing reports on the designs, materials, and implementation of different urban accessibility projects. Building from this, I seek to foreground the IMPD as a ‘sensitizing device’, affecting in different modes the wider implementation of an ‘accessibility culture’ within the City Hall’s urban professionals’ planning and interventions. A fragile and fallible diplomatic task of affecting peripherally the multifarious sociomaterial articulation of accessibility arrangements, where many compromises have to be made with the goal of making Barcelona a city ‘for all’.

Caring through Design?: En torno a la silla and the ‘Joint Problem-Making’ of Technical Aids

1119053498

Charlotte Bates, Rob Imrie, and Kim Kullman have edited the challenging compilation Care and Design: Bodies, Buildings, Cities (out November 2016 with Wiley-Blackwell).
In their words, the book: “connects the study of design with care, and explores how concepts of care may have relevance for the ways in which urban environments are designed. It explores how practices and spaces of care are sustained specifically in urban settings, thereby throwing light on an important arena of care that current work has rarely discussed in detail.”
Israel Rodríguez-Giralt and I contribute with the Chapter 11 “Caring through Design?: En torno a la silla and the ‘Joint Problem-Making’ of Technical Aids (pp. 198-218).

The idea for a wheelchair armrest/briefcase CC BY NC SA En torno a la silla (2012)

Abstract

In this paper, we engage with the practices of En torno a la silla (ETS), which involve fostering small DIY interventions and collective material explorations, in order to demonstrate how these present a particularly interesting mode of caring through design. They do so, firstly, by responding to the pressing needs and widespread instability that our wheelchair friends face in present-day Spain, and, secondly, through the intermingling of open design and the Independent-Living movement’s practices and method, which, taken together, enable a politicisation and problematisation of the usual roles of people and objects in the design process. In the more conventional creation of commoditized care technologies, such as technical aids, the role of the designer as expert is clearly disconnected from that of the lay or end user. Rather, technical aids are objects embodying the expertise of the designer to address the needs of the user. As we will argue, ETS unfolds a ‘more radical’ approach to the design of these gadgets through what we will term ‘joint problem-making,’ whereby caring is understood as a way of sharing problems between users and designers, bringing together different skills to collaboratively explore potential solutions.

PDF

¿Poner el cuerpo en común?

[Texto aparecido en el blog “Fuera de Clase“]

244. Si alguien dice ‘Tengo un cuerpo’, puede preguntársele ‘¿Quién está hablando aquí con esta boca?’
– L. Wittgenstein, Sobre la certeza

Infraestructuras corporales

Berlin, Institut für Leistungsmedizin, Prof. Mellerowicz

Imagen CC BY, tomada de Wikimedia Commons

Existen diferentes formas, a veces incluso inconmensurables, de “hacer cuerpo”, de construir saberes en torno a él. Pero también hay distintas maneras de no poder hacerlo, o de no poder hacerlo de la misma manera, de no encontrar modos de componerlo. Incluso diferentes modos de no saber ni cómo “hacerse” un cuerpo…

Para intentar ejemplificar, permítaseme la osadía de la autobiografía: tan peligrosa por sus modos de construir legitimaciones y posiciones de privilegio en ese ser capaz de decirse y narrarse; un modo narrativo difícilmente disputable, pero a la vez tan frágil y disputado por su incapacidad para argumentar y convencer ante un auditorio cientificista. No le llamemos autobiografía, pues. Digamos, más bien, que quisiera poner mi propia experiencia de hacer cuerpo para pensar colectivamente sobre ella… Bueno, el caso es que hay días que me levanto hecho polvo por la alergia. No creo ser un caso extremo ni especialmente grave, pero hay noches que me cuesta dormir por los mocos o que me levanto en mitad de la noche un poco ahogado con lo que espero que no sea más que un principio de asma, algo que la mayor parte de las veces resuelvo con un pequeño chute de mi inhalador, que he aprendido a tener cerca de mí como un fetiche desde pequeño. Aunque otros días, sobre todo cuando me levanto cansadísimo por una noche toledana, siempre pienso en esa frasecita del acervo popular: “el cuerpo es sabio”, que comúnmente suele proferirse para indicar que el cuerpo sabe más de lo que parece sobre lo que le aqueja, y que sólo tendríamos que escucharlo un poco más.

Queremos pensar desde la experiencia, pero la experiencia a veces es muy compleja. Como he estado a punto de quedarme en el sitio alguna que otra vez me darían ganas de reírme al oír esta expresión (más de miedo que de otra cosa), porque si tuviera que contar únicamente con la sabiduría de mi propio cuerpo sobre sí mismo no sé ni dónde estaría a estas alturas. Desde los 4 años y, tras algunos buenos sustos de mis padres, he aprendido gracias a la ayuda de diferentes profesionales sanitarios a reconocer mis sensaciones a través de infinidad de pruebas como tests de reacción o espirometrías; y he aprendido a contarme y notarme como un ente excesivamente sensible y cuyo sistema inmunitario reacciona de forma desmesurada –aunque a baja intensidad, afortunadamente– a la presencia ambiental de pequeñas partículas de polen, ácaros u hongos, que he aprendido a nombrar alérgenos y que no “veo” hasta que no me noto un picor intenso por todo el cuerpo, irritación en ojos y nariz, tengo muchos mocos espesos o me falta el aire.

Con una cierta frecuencia llevo a cabo ciertos rituales de prevención farmacológica y ambiental que me han enseñado desde pequeño a través de manuales o folletos (y más recientemente  consultando páginas web oficiales u otros medios). Por ello, y no sin una magna pereza que muchas veces no venzo, además de tomarme mis pastillas: (1) reviso los “boletines aerobiológicos” de mi zona, donde grosso modo me cuentan los niveles de concentración de ciertas partículas en el aire para ver si tengo que estar especialmente alerta; (2) e intento mantener una higiene básica de mi dormitorio, debatiéndome –sobre todo cuando he vivido en ciudades húmedas–, en épocas de gran polinización entre ventilar y sufrir de lo que hay fuera, o cerrar y padecer de los efectos de los ácaros.

Claro, si inventáramos un medidor universal de sufrimiento planetario, y si lo sumamos a otras condiciones socio-económicas, seguramente yo sufro poco: en intensidad, en cantidad, en frecuencia o en momentos. Pero lo suficiente para que no se me olvide nunca mi fragilidad ni la sutil infraestructura de relaciones, saberes y tecnologías que me ayuda a mantenerme con vida. Más que “tener un cuerpo” si acaso no soy más que un cuerpo que participa de un grandísimo enjambre de modos de “ser tenido” o “sostenido”. Gracias al sostén del que me proveen diferentes colectivos, más o menos instituidos, que han dedicado su vida a construir conocimiento sobre cuerpos como el mío, poniéndolo en circulación y materializándolo en terapias y tecnologías (véase Mol, 2002), hasta el momento he podido permanecer relativamente estable y seguir haciendo mis cosas.

Pero en este relato es imposible olvidar que los modos de hacer cuerpo o, mejor dicho, estas infraestructuras corporales están atravesadas por distribuciones diferenciales del sufrimiento y la violencia (Butler, 2004). Quizá pueda decir, no sin un cierto resquemor, que  tengo la suerte de que mi dolencia ha podido ser resuelta con una cierta sencillez gracias a la industria farmacéutica y puedo acceder a compuestos farmacológicos relativamente baratos, como los antihistamínicos, la budesónida o la terbutalina, que me permiten salir adelante. Pero, ciertamente, el acceso a fármacos y el poder experto que los gobierna y que hace de llave de paso para su dispensario (Petryna, Lakoff & Kleinman, 2006) es, para otros muchos modos de hacer cuerpo o de intentar hacerlo, un verdadero problema, ya sea por la dificultad económica para su acceso o por la inexistencia de un compuesto apropiado.

Pero quisiera ir al margen de mí –no soy importante en esta historia– e incluso más allá de la experiencia de la enfermedad. Mi intención con este relato es intentar poner en evidencia que quizá uno de los principales asuntos a dirimir a la hora de pensar desde la experiencia es un tema de infraestructuras corporales. Me explico: no ya sólo de una red de relaciones entre artefactos y saberes, sino de que quizá el cuerpo sea un asunto infraestructural. Porque no hay un cuerpo al margen de todo el ejercicio de montaje de diferentes infraestructuras que permiten que esos cuerpos puedan ser puestos en común, si es que lo consiguen. Infraestructuras que permiten o limitan que alguien se componga como cuerpo “homologable”, llevando vidas más o menos vivibles, o convirtiendo nuestra vida en un calvario al estar esta infraestructura corporal sometida a un problema de complejidad, por articular una relación abyecta o in-componible. Pero eso no quiere decir que esté todo dicho…

Activismo encarnado y la política del conocimiento sobre el cuerpo

2

Imagen CC BY, tomada de Wikimedia Commons

Precisamente porque todos somos “(sos)tenidos” por una complejísima madeja de interdependencias que nos “(sos)tiene” con vida a pesar de ser tan frágiles, nos haríamos un flaco favor si no consideráramos la larga historia de disputas en torno al conocimiento sobre el cuerpo, aunque sólo sea la sutil e insidiosa violencia de que algunas personas son tenidas peor que otras, en muchos casos por los propios basamentos ideológicos o epistemológicos sobre qué entendemos debiera de ser un cuerpo y para qué debiera de servir.

Como nos recuerdan distintas sensibilidades feministas y trabajos vinculados conmovimientos anti-racistas o los colectivos LGBT, la medicina y ciencias afines han sido en muchos momentos no sólo ciencias de la salud pública, sino grandísimas máquinas de producción de discriminación racista, sexista, edaísta y capacitista sobre unos cuerpos “patologizados” y tratados como “raros”, “enfermos”, ”diversos” o “no-normativos” (véase Coll Planas, 2011) con respecto al patrón antropométrico del varón blanco, heterosexual de mediana edad y capaz. Pero también máquinas del olvido para esos cuerpos que sufren “sin sentido” porque sus síntomas o sus problemas no cuadran con la particular forma de construir saberes y tomar decisiones de nuestras instituciones sanitarias, y quedan sistemáticamente fuera, cuerpos extranjeros en su propia tierra.

Quizá por ello tiene un enorme sentido prestar atención a los diferentes modos en que un cuerpo puede o no ser puesto en común. Pero la puesta en común no es fácil, y no se puede hacer asumiendo que existe lo “en común” o “lo común”. No son pocos los casos (véase Lafuente, Alonso & Rodríguez, 2013) en los que diferentes comunidades de afectados por un algo que progresivamente se vislumbra como un mal común (como las famosas intoxicaciones masivas por el  aceite de colza o las malformaciones fetales causadas por la ingesta de talidomida; por no hablar de los efectos tóxicos del llamadodesastre de Bhopal -analizados por Fortun, 2000- o las consecuencias sanitarias derivadas del accidente de Chernóbil -relatadas por Petryna, 2002-) o grupos de personas que poco a poco se descubren trabajosamente aquejadas por algo muy parecido, originariamente ignoto, necesitan realizar muchos esfuerzos por mostrar y demostrar que lo que les ocurre es cierto o para intentar intervenir la manera en que son tratadas por los sanitarios.

Muchas de estas personas acaban abocadas a llevar a cabo diferentes proyectos de “activismo encarnado”: esto es, en palabras de Israel Rodríguez Giralt a desarrollar “forma[s] de acción asociativa cada vez más influyente que politiza la propia experiencia para convertirla en objeto de controversia política”. Esto se hace de muchas maneras, llegando en ocasiones a construir o proveer de evidencia de lo que les aqueja y cómo debieran de ser tratadas. Pero casi siempre suele suponer una politización de la propia experiencia corporal ya sea para contradecir, contrapuntear, matizar o enrolar a otros, en muchos casos a los profesionales que “gestionan” sus situaciones o les atienden. Un buen ejemplo sigue siendo el trabajo de politización corporal desarrollado por los afectados por el VIH de ACT-UP en los 1980 y 1990: que reclamaban el control sobre sus propias vidas, defendiendo su derecho a que no se les tratara con placebo en ensayos clínicos, puesto que del tratamiento para todo el mundo dependía su vida (Epstein, 1996).

Pero también existen innumerables ejemplos de esos colectivos que necesitan articular formas de “contra-experticia”, desarrollando formatos de vindicación de “su propia experticia sobre su experiencia” frente a “los expertos en la experiencia de los otros”. Particularmente interesantes de entre estas dinámicas son los que Antonio Lafuente denomina formatos de “ciencia colateral”: esa ciencia hecha con los desechos, que produce conocimiento con lo desechado por los saberes institucionalizados y que, al hacerlo, produce la apertura de la naturaleza del conocimiento sobre lo corpóreo a nuevos horizontes.

Aunque también existen casos de grupos de personas sometidos a una creciente y prolongada agonía en tanto sus dolencias no son consideradas o componibles desde algunas infraestructuras de saberes, técnicas y artefactos hegemónicos. Un buen ejemplo de esas luchas sería la que protagonizan personas aquejadas por lo que se conocen como síndromes de sensibilidad central (entre las que se suele agrupar lafibromialgia, la sensibilidad química múltiple o el síndrome de fatiga crónica), que han venido siendo materia de debate público en épocas recientes al intentar diferentes grupos de presión que fueran consideradas enfermedades que dieran derecho a una pensión, para lo que numerosas de las personas aquejadas han venido produciendo relatos narrativos y audiovisuales sobre sus problemas para ser creídas, sobre las dificultades para probar lo que les ocurre, sobre su incapacidad de trabajar y las enormes diatribas a las que se enfrentan para acondicionar o adaptar sus hogares de un modo que les permita vivir algo mejor (véase los relatos autobiográficos de Caballé, 2009 y Valverde, 2009; pero también el ensayo de Murphy, 2006).

Potenciales y límites de un cuerpo (en) común

M0001845 John Haygarth. Line engraving by W. Cooke, 1827, after J. H.

Imagen CC BY, tomada de Wikimedia Commons

Estos movimientos o colectivos que desarrollan innumerables prácticas de activismo encarnado traen a la presencia la necesidad de pensar y reflexionar largamente sobre los modos en que se crea, comparte y valida el conocimiento experiencial y existencial o “sobre lo que nos pasa”. Pero ¿qué hacer con estas afecciones que, como comentan las personas que la padecen, son “enfermedades de la normalidad”? Formas de hacer cuerpo que ponen en crisis nuestros modelos de trabajo, conocimiento instituido o consumo industrial:

“Nosotros, los enfermos de normalidad, somos una anomalía. Un error del sistema. Y lo que más deseamos, por encima de todo, es que este lo pague caro. Nuestra verdad es la verdad del mundo. De su funcionamiento. El cuerpo enfermo de fatiga se inscribe en el interior de un nuevo tipo de politización más existencial que, por un lado, instituye una verdad capaz de producir un desplazamiento y, por otro lado, converge con la práctica política de la fuerza del anonimato” (López Petit, 2014: 75).

A buen seguro podríamos expandir la reflexión sobre estos problemas a colectivos como los desahuciados arrojados al vacío sin hogar, los parados condenados en vida a ser una exterioridad irrecuperable, los refugiados sirios entre el fuego cruzado y el neo-fascismo de la Europa cristiana, las cuidadoras inmigrantes atrapadas en condiciones de precariedad sin voz ni voto… ¿Cómo componer otras relaciones con estos cuerpos “abyectos”, como los llama Murphy (2006)? Abyectos no sólo porque pongan en duda aspectos morales o normativas para otras capas de la población, sino porque ponen en crisis o disputarían nuestras formas de “saber articular un saber sobre ellos”, pero también de pensar la política: son cuerpos en muchas ocasiones agónicos que quiebran el modelo heroico de la agencia, ya sea en la versión individual-liberal o colectiva-activista. ¿Cómo articular otros modos de relación con ellos que huyan del paternalismo o del buenismo con que ciertas formas de caridad o de gestión tecnocrática han podido desarrollar? ¿Cómo podrían estos cuerpos traer consigo no sólo una condición abyecta sino esperanzadora sobre cómo articular infraestructuras corporales más en común donde generemos un cierto cuidado que permita nivelar las asimetrías?

En su reciente libro De la necropolítica neoliberal a la empatía radical, Clara Valverde (2015) aboga con acierto por la construcción de “espacios intersticiales” que permitan una alianza de los cuerpos comúnmente excluidos por las dinámicas económicas, epistémicas y políticas contemporáneas. Es más, en una reciente entrevista, llega a sugerir que:

“Las iniciativas, ideas y grupos implicados en lo común son el antídoto contra la necropolítica. Lo que el poder absoluto quiere dividir, nosotros lo tenemos que juntar. Nos tenemos que juntar enfermos, sanos, trans y todos los géneros, razas varias, ancianos, niños…”

Pero los innumerables fracasos o fragilidades permanentes para articular una infraestructura corporal (recordemos, relacional, de saberes, artefactos) con un grado de institucionalización estable de muchos colectivos y grupos que están últimamente intentando esto (pienso, por ejemplo, en un caso cercano: la #redcacharrera: 1 | 2 | 3), nos indican que sabemos muy poco de cómo hacer estas infraestructuras corporales en común, o que existen muy pocas condiciones para que devengan infraestructuras per se. Y no hay más remedio que poner en el centro de la discusión el marasmo de condiciones –no sólo circunscritas a la supuesta “lógica neoliberal” o  a los modos de precarización de la austeridad, sino también a la elevada intensidad del sostenimiento relacional activista y a ciertas de sus lógicas implícitas, que nos impiden prestar atención a ciertas otras cosas, o la falta de costumbre, hábito y tiempo para hacerlo, etc.– que nos privan de toda posibilidad de poder explorar, analizar, detallar y encontrar saberes y modos de registro, espacios y métodos de encuentro, así como formatos institucionales (ya sean públicos o no), legales y económicos sostenibles para poner en común lo que nos pasa, para poder construir la jurisprudencia sobre nuestros cuerpos diversos. Unas condiciones extremadamente frágiles que hacen más complicado aún si cabe articularse con cuerpos “todavía-no” o “no-fácilmente” en común, o prestar atención a la enorme cantidad de experiencias encarnadas “en el umbral”.

Aunque nos falte el tiempo, aunque estemos sin fuerzas, necesitamos hacer un sitio importante en nuestros aprendizajes cotidianos a la exploración pormenorizada de qué permite y qué no construir infraestructuras no ya sólo para cobijar esos cuerpos (Biehl & Petryna, 2011), sino también analizar, poner en palabras y compartir diferentes modos prácticos de sostenernos de formas más horizontales y en común (Butler, 2015), sin dejarnos abatir por el hecho de que la mayor parte de las veces nuestras experiencias serán difícilmente componibles o explicables.

Referencias

Biehl, J.  & Petryna, A. (2011). Bodies of rights and therapeutic markets. Social Research: An International Quarterly, 78(2), 359–386.
Butler, J. (2004). Precarious Life: The Powers of Mourning and Violence. London: Verso.
Butler, J. (2015). Bodily Vulnerability, Coalitional Politics. En Notes Toward a Performative Theory of Assembly (pp. 123-153). Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
Caballé, E. (2009). Desaparecida: Una vida rota por la Sensibilidad Química Múltiple. Barcelona: Viejo Topo.
Coll Planas, G. (2011). El género desordenado: Críticas en torno a la patologización de la transexualidad. Barcelona: Egales.
Epstein, S. (1996). Impure Science: AIDS, Activism, and the Politics of Knowledge.Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.
Fortun, K. (2001). Advocacy After Bhopal: Environmentalism, Disaster, New Global Orders. Chicago: University of Chicago Press
Lafuente, A., Alonso, A. & Rodríguez, J. (2013). ¡Todos sabios! Ciencia ciudadana y conocimiento expandido. Madrid: Cátedra.
López Petit, S.(2014). Hijos de la noche. Barcelona: Bellaterra.
Mol, A. (2002). The body multiple. Ontology in Medical Practice. Durham: Duke University Press.
Murphy, M. (2006). Sick Building Syndrome and the Problem of Uncertainty: Environmental Politics, Technoscience, and Women Workers. Durham, NC: Duke University Press.
Petryna, A. (2002). Life Exposed: Biological Citizens after Chernobyl. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.
Petryna, A., Lakoff,  A.& Kleinman, A. (Eds.). (2006). Global Pharmaceuticals: Ethics, Markets, Practices. Durham, NC: Duke University Press.
Valverde, C. (2009). Pues tienes buena cara. Síndrome de Fatiga Crónica, una enfermedad políticamente incorrecta. Barcelona: Martínez Roca.
Valverde, C. (2015). De la necropolítica neoliberal a la empatía radical: Violencia discreta, cuerpos excluidos y repolitización. Barcelona: Icaria.

Agradecimientos

Dedicado a mis compas En torno a la silla: Alida Díaz, Nuria Gómez y Silvia Sanz que me han ayudado a revisar un texto largamente en el tintero y a no olvidar muchos modos distintos de poner el cuerpo en el centro. Con un agradecimiento especial para Antonio Lafuente, que me ayudó a aprender a afectarme por la idea del “cuerpo común”.

Wild research: Radical openings in technoscientific practice? – 2016 EASST/4S open track

FMARS_Crew_7_MISR_2002-07-19

The Mars Society CC-BY-SA-3.0

Please  consider submitting a paper for the 4S-EASST 2016 conference (deadline February 21st) taking place from August 31st to September 3rd in Barcelona to our open track!

We’d be very grateful if you could also forward it to potentially interested colleagues. 

Wild research: Radical openings in technoscientific practice?

A collaborative spectre is haunting science and technology. In the past decades we have witnessed an explosion of radical openings of research practices where increasingly technified citizens and engaged professionals collaborate in the most diverse forms of knowledge production in both online and offline platforms of all kinds. In these efforts they generate and put into circulation documentation on the most diverse range of issues, attempting to materially intervene their everyday worlds with different political aims. Practices that, for lack of a better term, might be described as ‘wild research’ not only signal collaborative redistributions of the who, how, when and where of knowledge production, circulation and validation, but also more experiential and sociologically-related expansions of the knowledge registers and material interventions there emerging: a whole constellation of practices forging different versions of ‘science and technology by other means’. Paying attention to these transformations this track would like to welcome ethnographic and historical works analyzing in depth open, collaborative and experimental ‘wild research’ projects helping to expand what STS up to date has considered more collaborative or more democratic forms of technoscientific production: participatory engagements of lay people into expert-driven processes such as in citizen science or articulations of counter-expertise and evidence-based activism to engage in conversations with experts. We are particularly interested in analyzing not only the different forms of knowledge and the political, but also the forms of STS otherwise that these radical collaborative openings in technoscientific practice might be bringing to the fore.

Convenors: Tomas S. Criado (MCTS, TU München) & Adolfo Estalella (Spanish National Research Council – CSIC)

For more information on how to propose a paper, please check the conference’s call for papers

To submit a paper to this open track, please click here

IMAGE CREDITS: The Mars Society CC-BY-SA-3.0

Vulnerability Tests. Matters of “Care for Matter” in E-waste Practices

"Waste-picker in the squatted warehouse in Barcelona extracting some copper pieces welded in a motherboard" CC BY Blanca Callén

Blanca Callén and I collaborate with an article in a special issue of  Tecnoscienza we are particularly happy to take part in: a whole exploration on ‘Maintenance & Repair in Science and Technology Studies‘ edited by our colleagues Jérôme Denis, Alessandro Mongili & David Pontille (thank you for the editorial work!).

Our text (see below for more information) is an exploration on “mending cultures” and their modes of “care for matter” understood from the “vulnerability tests” there being mobilised. It derives from a presentation in 2013’s CRESC conference, where we attempted to think comparatively on our projects on DIY technical aids and e-waste. Despite this comparison is something we might work a bit further in future publications, I’d like to thank once more Blanca for her generosity in allowing me to “think with” the materials of her very interesting project “Scrapping Politics

Vulnerability Tests. Matters of “Care for Matter” in E-waste Practices

Abstract: In this paper we will think ethnographically about how material vulnerability is dealt with and conceived of in the practice of informal menders. We explore different practices to “care for matter”, mobilized in dealing with obsolete computers, categorized as electronic waste, and will analyse the epistemic repertoires to acknowledge and intervene in such computers vulnerabilities. In dialogue with STS and Repair and Maintenance Studies literature, we will move from vulnerability as an ontological quality of the world to the enacted properties and epistemic repertoires emerging from concrete “tests”, through which we might learn how vulnerability matters. In particular, we pay attention to three specific vulnerability tests performed by these informal menders, underpinning particular distributions of labour as well as concrete enactments of vulnerability, and how to make it matter. Namely, sensing matter: manipulative practices of electronic waste whereby vulnerability is enacted as a property of materials; setting up informal experiments: informal practices of trial and error whereby vulnerability appears as a result of dis/functioning technical systems; and intervening in obsolescence: whereby sociomaterial orders regulate how material vulnerabilities are redistributed and put to the test.

Keywords: maintenance & repair; matters of care; vulnerability; test; electronic waste.

Published in Tecnoscienza: Italian Journal of Science and Technology Studies 6 (2) pp. 17-40 | PDF

Image credits ‘Waste-picker in the squatted warehouse in Barcelona extracting some copper pieces welded in a motherboard’ CC BY Blanca Callén

Older People in a Connected Autonomy? Promises and Challenges in the Technologisation of Care

connected autonomy

New article published in the REIS (Revista Española de Investigaciones Sociológicas), nº 152 October – December 2015, pp. 105-120 published in English & Spanish

 

Older People in a Connected Autonomy? Promises and Challenges in the Technologisation of Care

(co-authored with Miquel Domènech)

Abstract

This paper offers an ethnographic interpretation of how in a changing context of family care different Spanish home telecare services provide older people with social links to prevent their isolation, granting them ‘connected autonomy’: the promotion of their autonomy and independent living through connectedness. To do so, services need to craft a network of ‘contacts’. Different versions of the term figuration are employed to describe the practical materializations of the forms of relatedness put in place by such services: what roles become available and explicitly supported; what other figurations of relatedness (e.g., kinship, friendship, neighbourliness) they come across; what happens when these different figurations of relatedness meet. In doing this, our aim is to allow space to reflect ethically on the practical relational promises and challenges of these forms of technologized care of older people.

Full textPDF in English

¿Personas mayores en autonomía conectada? Promesas y retos en la tecnologización del cuidado

(escrito en colaboración con Miquel Domènech)

Resumen 

Este artículo propone una interpretación etnográfica de cómo, en un contexto de cuidado familiar en transición, servicios de teleasistencia españoles buscan proveer a las personas mayores de vínculos sociales para prevenir su aislamiento, articulando una infraestructura de conexión y monitorización para promover lo que denominamos «autonomía conectada». Para funcionar estos servicios necesitan articular redes de «contactos». Empleamos diferentes acepciones del término figuración para entender los significados de la materialización práctica de diferentes formas relacionales por parte de estos servicios, prestando atención a: los roles que hacen disponibles; con qué otras figuraciones relacionales se encuentran y qué ocurre al encontrarse. A partir de esta descripción, abrimos un debate ético acerca de las promesas y retos relacionales que enfrentan los intentos por tecnologizar el cuidado de las personas mayores.

Texto completoPDF en castellano

Analysing hands-on-tech carework in telecare installations: Frictional Encounters with Gerontechnological Designs

PrendergastAging

Chapter recently published in the book AGING AND THE DIGITAL LIFE COURSE, edited by David Prendergast and Chiara Garattini, Volume 3 of Berghahn’s Life Course, Culture and Aging: Global Transformations Series [ISBN  978-1-78238-691-9 (June 2015)]

Analysing hands-on-tech carework in telecare installations: Frictional Encounters with Gerontechnological Designs

(Co-written with Daniel López)

Brief summary 

In the past twenty years gerontechnological technologies have been marketed as plug-and-play solutions to complex and costly care necessities. They are expected to reduce the cost of traditional forms of hands-oncare. Science and Technology Studies (STS) have contributed to discussing this idea (for an overall perspective, see Schillmeier and Domenech 2010) by pointing at important transformations in the care arrangements where these technologies are implemented. Instead of just ‘plug-and-play’ solutions, transformations are found in protagonists, their roles and functions, and more importantly in redefining care. This chapter seeks to add new nuances to the definition of care in these scenarios by paying attention to what we term ‘hands-on-tech care work’. This terminology refers to the practices, usually undertaken by technicians (installation, repair and maintenance), which hold together the silent infrastructures that are now considered to be suitable and sustainable forms of care work for ageing societies. Hands-on-tech care work is usually hidden from most of the discussions concerning new care technologies for older people. On the one hand this is because installation, repair and maintenance work on telecare devices is considered as a mere technical procedure, i.e. not considered to be part of care work. On the other hand it is because of the widespread view that if technologies are well designed, installing them is simply a matter of ‘plug-and-play’. However, if we look carefully into the installation process, these concepts are easily refuted. This is because these technologies need to be continually welcomed, tuned, adjusted, tweaked, personalized, updated and installed.

Full textPDF

Vital Mobilizations: Care and Surveillance in the Age of Global Connectivity

2-3_logo-college-bleu-_new1

1 & 2 June 2015 | Paris, Collège d’études mondiales (FMSH)

Organizing team: Vincent Duclos, Vinh-Kim Nguyen, Tomás Sanchez-Criado & Frédéric Keck

Speakers/discussants: Susanne Bauer, Vincent Duclos, Ian Harper, Frédéric Keck, Janina Kehr, Ann Kelly, Andrew Lakoff, Theresa MacPhail, Pierre Minn, Maggie Mort, Vinh-Kim Nguyen, Vololona Rabeharisoa, Antoinette Rouvroy, Tony D. Sampson, Tomás Sánchez-Criado, Ian Tucker, and Mauro Turrini.
The workshop will be held at Maison Suger, 16-18 rue Suger, Paris.
The event is free, although registration is needed. Please contact: vduclos@msh-paris.fr
On every front, life is being put into motion: fostered and protected against, accelerated and contained, augmented and flattened, contested and debated. It is being measured, predicted, connected and communicated by the most variegated actors with the most varied aims. Life has become the object of continuous care and surveillance. Life, then, is being mobilized. This workshop aims to explore how global connectivity contributes to mobilize life, namely to its generalized availableness as well as to the spontaneity and ubiquity of its contestations. It intends to examine how life is being generated and accounted for, put in danger and saved, disseminated and ordered in a world marked by increased interconnectivity and precariousness. Specifically, the workshop will pay attention to the concrete infrastructures, technologies, and rationalities contributing to the design of spaces of care and surveillance. Hence, in contrast with the widespread conception of a seamless worldwide circulation of knowledge, data and expertise, our aim would be to detail the embeddedness, plasticity and sheer materiality inherent to vital mobilizations.
+ info: Vital Mobilizations blog