Categories
animals atmosphere caring infrastructures city-making collectives ecologies functional diversity & disability rights heat and shade more-than-human older people publications urban and personal devices

The City of Shades > Tarde

Originally published in Tarde

▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒ 

 This issue was prepared by Tomás Criado and curated by Zofia Buni and Paloma Yáñez Serrano. Design and edition: Santiago Orrego

▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒▒ 

Editorial note: The City of Shades is the second issue in a series of urban explorations that are part of an ongoing collaboration between Tarde and xcol.org.

Download Zine | DOI: 10.17605/OSF.IO/JU6VM

Our climate cultures are in crisis. Heat is no longer a distant or abstract event, something that happens to us. It is among us. And in its most extreme versions, it appears more like a chronic illness with profound, unequal, and devastating effects [1].

In a peculiar way, for a country like Spain, where I live, accustomed to sun and heat as a recurring seasonal issue, this places us before a crisis for which we can feel over-prepared. But summer after summer, heat wave after heat wave, inherited habits and practices do not quite work. It is no longer enough to walk under cover, wear sunscreen, drink a lot, dress lightly, lower the blinds, and wait for the worst to happen because the worst is yet to come on those torrid, tropical, and infernal nights, as meteorologists call them.

Modern infrastructures and construction methods, which made us feel at the avant-garde, appear today hopelessly problematic. We need a radical change. Different international and intergovernmental organizations have long warned that the response to climate change must start from cities [2]: increasingly populated settlements and complex-to-change infrastructures from which we need to rethink the habitability of the planet.

Anti-solar urbanism

The ongoing climatic mutation places us before the challenge of reconfiguring urban ideas of care, protection, or shelter, inventing more plural ways of living, and protecting those who could be more exposed or suffer more from its devastating effects [3]. In that sense, we live in a time of urgency and frantic searches for solutions. However, and this is my proposal, in addition to infrastructural or “nature-based” solutions, we have an important task before us: this requires, above all, redescribing what the urban might be.

In situations of great uncertainty, where how to respond is sometimes difficult to imagine, we may need to train themselves to pay attention to the seemingly irrelevant but crucial, such as urban shades and shadows: unimportant entities that articulate urban life and our daily relationships with the sun and heat.

Without a doubt, there is nothing more conventional than shades. As terrestrial beings we all have one. But thinking about urban shades can be something much deeper than it seems, since it forces us to pay attention differently to our everyday environments. Indeed, what is shade if not a changing relationship we enter with the Sun as it passes through our habitats throughout the day?

Edvard Munch (1911) The Sun / Solen

With Copernicus and Galileo, modernity put the Sun at the center. One of the many effects of this heliocentric turn and its profound cosmological effects is that we tend to attribute to the star that presides over our firmament a beneficent role, the ability to give life and irradiate us with its strength, but this regularly positive appreciation needs a counterpoint: What to do when it harms us or puts us at risk, such as in the conditions of extreme atmospheric heat or in the solar exposure that leads to melanoma? [4]

The modern philosophical tradition, but also our forms of artistic expression and folklore –– with innumerable children’s songs praising the Sun –– have difficulties treating without prejudice everything that remains outside of these irradiations: a solarized caricature treated as the archaic, the conservative, the dangerous, the murky hours of the night. However, and this is the hypothesis that I would like to share here, what if we have never been solar? What if, to breathe and think again, sheltered from wild solar power, we need to move the Sun away from the center?

This does not necessarily mean to stop considering the relevance of the Sun, nor resurrecting the Platonic distrust that condemns us to see nothing more than the shadows projected on the walls of a cave. The type of ‘sheltered thinking’ that we could begin to practice has, rather, shades at its center: What if shades were not the possibility of thinking negatively, taking things for what they are not, but a way of thinking protected from the Sun and its scorching heat and irradiation? In fact, as baroque painting amply showed, shadows are central to our perception, allowing figure/ground distinctions, but they are also key to our understanding of the world and our survival [5].

Climate shelter

Taken thusly, our terrestrial life could be re-read as a long interspecific story of how the living have learned to protect ourselves from solar irradiation. That is one of the most interesting arguments in the work of paleontologist and geologist Anthony J. Martin, Evolution Underground, which traces the evolutionary importance of burrows and underground architectures for the survival on the face of the earth of many animals since time immemorial, including human beings [6].

But, going further, the atmosphere itself, an initial bacterial achievement, with its complex circulation of air, or later in the history of the Earth, the seas and river banks, the iridescent tapestry of clouds and forests are nothing but aspects of a patchy system, with singular expressions, of ways to capture, regulate, dissipate or block the Sun’s rays. In this renewed centrality of shades, we cannot forget plants and their important role in making our planet habitable.

Cloud shade

Philosopher Emanuele Coccia expressed this very poetically in a recent conference titled “The Garden of the World.” One of his main arguments is that what we call Earth today cannot be understood but as a technical achievement of life, more precisely the work of plants, crucial to producing the atmosphere and orography, as well as the oxygen thanks to which other beings live:

“The Earth has the status of an artifact… a cultural production of all living beings that inhabit it and not only the transcendental precondition for the possibility of life. Gaia is Flora’s daughter. The Sun is Flora’s cosmic doll” (my translation) [7].

And what would have happened to the terraforming of our planet were it not for plants and, more particularly, trees: with their ability to transform soil and air, producing habitats or microclimates so that many animals could begin to crawl beyond the seas sheltered from the Sun [8]

Tree shade

In fact, many of our primary experiences of shade and protection from the Sun actually have to do with the delicate interweaving of tree foliage and the strange collage of plant cover. Thinking with trees allows us to venture another hypothesis about the habitability of our planet: What if shades have been more important than what we have told ourselves until now? What’s more, despite the fact that they are usually considered a secondary product of the Sun, its negative version, what if shades were the very condition of habitability on Earth and, therefore, in urban habitats troubled by climatic mutation?

The interesting thing is that even if shades are an old acquaintance, growing environmental concerns have caused administrations and professionals of all kinds to begin to recover this daily environmental relationship, long forgotten by modern forms of urbanization. For this reason, it has gained great importance in different technical solutions to face the extreme heat of the present: municipal shading plans, bioclimatic itineraries, or shade infrastructures [9]. This requires revitalizing ancient knowledges and techniques, as well as speculating and creating new solutions to mitigate and adapt to increasing heat.

Stating that we have never been solar, paying attention to shades also means restoring the violence exercised against many ancestral traditions by the moderns, with their hygienist obsession with clean air and wide, controlled streets intended primarily for traffic. This heliocentric or solar urbanism was the way in which Reason re-incarnated as a city project. In the aftermath of this, centering shades is also a way to restore their relevance for urban habitability, which allows us to admire the wrongly called ‘vernacular’ architecture with different eyes, seeking inspiration! Also, as Paloma Yáñez Serrano suggested in a conversation, it might lead us to understand trees and plan shades not just as ‘infrastructure’ but something part of a complex sentient ecology we should allow to thrive, something urban ecology and forestry schools are far from doing!

Solar Urbanism

However, to say that we have never been solar is not to throw modernist architecture overboard but rather to notice modernist urban formations for which shade has also been relevant. That is, it is about re-reading architecture and urbanism not from the blinding light of the Enlightenment but from the murky atmospheres of shades and shadows, as architect Stephen Kite proposes in his book Shadow-makers, a cultural history of shadows as a ‘shaping factor in architecture’, both in its traditional and modern forms [10].

Although much of Kite’s book is devoted to the importance of shadow in defining the cavities of buildings and interior spaces, there is a wonderful chapter on the Mediterranean and Middle Eastern Islamic city because what is the medina –– an architectural conglomerate formed by deep canyon adobe buildings, together with canopies and the use of damp fabrics –– but a great ode to shade as a principle of urban habitability?[11].

Ladouali (2011) La casbah d’Alger

But there are also interesting examples of urban treatments of shades and shadow in different modernist traditions that have developed in hot and arid climates. This is extensively covered in a recent exhibition on tropical modernism in Africa and India curated by Christopher Turner at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London [12].

In Barcelona, where I reside, there is also a history to be reconstructed of modernist shade architectures, of which the two umbracles (shadow buildings) of the modernist Ciutadella and Montjuic parks stand out: Siamese structures, but that operate on the inverse principle of the greenhouse, even if conceived as part of the same colonial impulse. This is far from being a local story: a similar twin architecture can be found in Lisbon’s signature Estufa Quente and Estufa Fria. Indeed, umbracles or estufas frias and greenhouses can be read as key to what architectural historian Lydia Kallipoliti calls the grammars of ‘colonial acclimatization,’ which allowed the fragile transportation, and the massive relocation of plants, animals and people from different regions of the world, for the purposes of trade and exhibition, sometimes also starting out a new troubled life in the metropolis [13].

Umbracle de la Ciutadella (Ciutadella Park’s shade building)

And yet, the great ‘achievements’ of the past, no matter how problematic or interesting, cannot be ‘the’ solution. We have entered an experimental moment, one of great stupor. Our cities have become what the French philosopher and anthropologist Bruno Latour calls “critical zones”: complex unknown territories where living beings are literally risking their lives, but also where they rush the most to continue making liveable worlds in their irreducible plurality [14]. The challenge we face in what Latour calls the “new climatic regime” in these critical urban zones is, therefore, to engender plural forms of habitability in a frankly complex and problematic moment without guarantees [15].

To tentatively respond to this major challenge, I believe we need to experiment with forms of urban transformation. This may sound paradoxical, I know because we are at a moment where we feel like we have to run to do something to fix the problem right away. But we must be careful not to turn this rush into a technocratic project governed by experts or elites who impose on us how to live, as in the colonial period. No doubt, terrible things are underway, but there is a great danger of confusing the diagnosis with the solution, especially when we do not know how we could live and with whom.

Precisely in this moment of pressing urgency, we need more than ever an experimental culture to rethink the city. With this precaution concerning technical solutions, I do not mean that countless infrastructural arrangements –– such as porous and reflective pavements or shaded spaces to protect us from the Sun and the heat island effect ––are not important. We also need to learn to leave space for plants to develop or allow animals to thrive in cities on an equal footing. This is all key, but we need to go further.

Street canopy

At a time like this, we also need to address the social and material life of atmospheric and climatic phenomena, such as shades, whether already existing or designed. In a heated present, where the ability to shelter ourselves from the scorching Sun is a poorly distributed good, revitalizing their knowledge and generative practices may be crucial to relearning to live as earthly beings. 

To do this, perhaps we need a ‘Department of Umbrology’ in each of our territories. This notion was developed by writer Tim Horvath in his short story The discipline of shadows, where he explores the complex relationships in a comically absurd university department devoted to the study of the life of shadows, where physicists, shadow theater dramaturgs and Platonic philosophers coexist without understanding each other, generating funny situations in their mutual incomprehension [16].

Collateral shade

However, in an absurdly tragic moment like the one we find ourselves in, we might need to explore how to make the type of space inspired by that story exist, but not as a university department. Rather, taking inspiration from the description and intervention work of artivist collectives such as the Los Angeles Urban Rangers [17] or the dramaturgical speculative experiments of the Crisis Cabinet of Political Fictions [18], what if we imagined it as a workspace devoted to the study of and intervention in the urban life of the shades: hence developing umbrology as a practice addressing both physical and material aspects as well as social and cultural relationships.

To make it exist, we would need to train ourselves to appreciate the intricacies of this environmental relationship: devoting ourselves to the study of the complex relationships between the Sun and buildings, the street or trees, as well as the role that different types of shadows can have for different people or groups and their ways of surviving the scorching heat. I would like to appeal to the relevance of ethnography for this task because of how it foregrounds an investigation of the embodied and situated study of practices, the senses, and ways of life. Ethnography would also allow a different approach to inquiry, enabling an understanding of environmental phenomena beyond two well-trod paths in which we render shades readable and discussable: [19]

  • On the one hand, climatological and meteorological practices that foreground their temperature and other atmospheric variables (such as humidity), leaving in the shadows their lived or cultural dimensions, the forms of life from which they arise and those that make them emerge, enabling or disabling different urban climates;
  • On the other hand, the practices of spatial legibility, from a bird’s eye and in Euclidean terms, undertaken by projects such as ShadeMap or Shadowmapgeographic information systems (GIS) that, through geolocation, allow us to simulate the inclination of the Sun and the shades and shadows cast by the urban environment on our digital devices.
Bird safe glass, using shades

To study how to make our cities habitable again in the face of increasing heat, we also need to learn to describe with many more nuances, both symbolic and ephemeral, taking into account other knowledges and ways of articulating problems, the new terra ignota that our cities have become: undertaking experimental cartographic endeavours such as the one suggested by Frédérique Aït-Touati, Alexandra Arènes and Axelle Gregoire in their magnificent Terra Forma, hence allowing us to re-center our bodily implications in the urban climates we inhabit and the plurality of our ways of inhabiting them [20].

The importance of the lived body in ethnography is a key aspect since it can help us stop thinking about atmospheres or climate and, more specifically, heat as res extensa: as an external thing or issue, detached from our actions. Rather, as different recent works in the fields of history and social studies of science and technology have argued, climate, atmospheres, and heat are something humans have partaken in their making: by omission and commission, in more direct or more distant ways, in our daily practices, embodied and mediated by different technical gadgets, but also by the ways in which we consume and build cities: our clothing, our buildings with air conditioners. Put differently, as a result of deeply mediated collective practices [21].

The sociality of shades

Thus considered, shades cease being a mere natural effect and acquire relational cultural properties because there is no shadow equal to another, and its uniqueness depends on how we observe, practice, and interrogate it in its site-specificity. This sensitivity seems important to me because it would allow repopulating shades and shadows: not, to say it again, as the negative presentation of what can be seen or as empty places [22], but as sites that enable many living beings to thrive: hiding from the blinding light of both the Sun and the Enlightenment as a project.

This version of shades as protecting other life-forms deeply resonates with the antiracist work of radical Black Caribbean thinker Édouard Glissant, who coined ‘a right to opacity’ as a condition of survival for all forms of difference in the long tail of slavery [23]. But also, in a more clearly environmental sense, with the proposals of architectural historian and disability activist David Gissen [24]. Gissen defends the need to rethink cities from many forms of bodily vulnerability, commonly removed from the centrality of urbanism: Black communities, older people and children, people with chronic illnesses and disabilities. Particularly because of how the Sun and heat endanger them: like the older people suffering in silence the ‘fatal isolation’ of heat waves or the uncountable Black bodies of outdoors workers exposed to brutal conditions of heat and insolation [25]. This would dispute the Sun’s centrality in public space design, making shade into a careful urban design principle.

Solar playground

Considering the social and material shade arrangements from the practices of diverse bodies in need of urban supports, allows us to think of shades not only as a ‘civic resource’, but also as an ‘inequality index.’ Shade is, indeed, subject to different conditions of unequal access, both in troublesome everyday negotiations of spatial production and in the legal regulations of who is allowed to produce or live in the shadows and how in different contexts. Shade, thus, appears a key infrastructure for urban habitability. And that is the main reason why journalist Sam Bloch suggests shades should be turned into a mandate for urban designers, or even more radically by urban theorist Mike Davies, into a collective urban right [26].

But how to study shades ethnographically? Faced with this challenge, therefore, we actively need to relearn how to describe and dimension the problems we face – also the problems of solutions –in order to be able to test many proposals to make the plural habitability of our urban environments possible. We need, therefore, to cultivate urban speculation, not real estate! I am referring to our ability to think and rethink the many possible ways that the urban could have to make it habitable again. This would require both (i) the invention of devices to carry out field research, giving a new meaning to the term ‘shadowing’, and (ii) taking inventory of everyday spatial practices, focusing on the relationship that different people have with our perpetual companions as inhabitants under the Sun [27].

Shade on a notebook

Hence, experimenting and speculating on how to articulate a Department of Umbrology: a confederation of singular forms of thinking and intervention, a self-constituted entity from where we could liberate, imagine, and cultivate new urban sensibilities and responsibilities on how to make more livable cities. We need such a space to take responsibility for describing, protecting, and bringing to dimmed light many underground forms of knowledge and forms of collective intelligence that need opaque supports to flourish. That is, to discuss the multiple needs of a large number of unique actors often displaced by solar urbanization. I do not only mean those who cannot pay the air conditioning bill or those who need support to transform their homes and workspaces into more energy-efficient and comfortable. I also mean those who, like homeless people, appear as second-class humans, in addition to many non-human urbanites, like dogs or birds, we rarely think of when imagining climate policies.

For this proposal to work, we need very different professional and collective knowledges –– not just academic or institutional –– to work together. This mutual exchange and cross-contamination would allow exploring and trying out devices for urban inquiry, drawing on the plural sensibilities and knowledges to imagine how to equip these strange professionals of umbrology: between the natural and the cultural, with a particular interest in the analysis and politics of shades; devoting themselves to understanding the social and material complexity of shades, the multiplicity of actors and assemblages constituting them; the practices of generating shade, by and for whom, as well as the forms of sociality that they allow as regions or territories [28]: attending to their temporalities, their rhythms, and their spatial dramaturgies. 

If we are successful in setting up such an experiment in the ways we encounter and describe shady urban worlds, we might make another city appear, one usually overlooked: the city of shades! 

Online references

[1] As shown by two recent reports from the European Environment Agency: EEA Report No 07/2022: Climate change as a threat to health and well-being in Europe: focus on heat and infectious diseases, https://www.eea.europa.eu/publications/climate -change-impacts-on-health ; EEA Report No 22/2018: Unequal exposure and unequal impacts: social vulnerability to air pollution, noise and extreme temperatures in Europe, https://www.eea.europa.eu/publications/unequal-exposure-and-unequal-impacts

[2] A good example of this is the centrality that the issue of heat and the citizen response has in the recent 2022 IPCC report, particularly its chapter 6 “Cities, settlements and key infrastructure”, https://www.ipcc.ch/report/ar6/wg2/; or the initiatives of the Arsht -Rock Foundation to prepare for the risks of urban heat, around urban “heat officers”: https://onebillionresilient.org/project/chief-heat-officers/ or the categorization and naming of heat waves: https://onebillionresilient.org/project /categorizing-and-naming-heat-waves/   

[3] My argument draws on and is deeply inspired by the work of the late French philosopher and anthropologist Bruno Latour and many of his collaborators. In his work of the last decade, there is a central notion: “New Climatic Regime,” which refers to the problems as a way of life, production, and its dependence on fossil energies that a particular has thrown us into. A destructive regime that has transformed our environments, shaped our knowledges and political institutions for more than a century, putting the habitability of the planet at risk. At the same time, this characterization suggests the possibility of its transformation from an old regime (ancien régime) to a new one: this requires searching for other horizons of meaning to engender plural forms of habitability. For an introduction to these ideas, see Latour, B. (2017). Facing Gaia: Eight Lectures on the New Climatic Regime. Polity.

[4] For an attentive look at the elemental plurality of human and non-human practices, or the scalar paradoxes of the multiple spatial, corporal, temporal, historical-cultural configurations of our omnipresent relationship with the sun and the dissipation of its rays or what we could call “solarities” –– from the infrastructural forms linked to the photovoltaic energy transition to anthropogenic catastrophes induced by the carbonification of the atmosphere (where the sun appears as “the source of withering and desiccation, a maker of monstrous heat”, p.18), not to forget the planetary centrality of photosynthesis or diurnal cycles, or its effects in the production of fossil energy or our very visual perception systems –– see Howe, C., Diamanti, J., & Moore, A. (Eds.). (2023). Solarities: Elemental Encounters and Refractions. punctum books.

[5] The most detailed attempt to restore the philosophical centrality of shadows that I am aware of is that of Casati, R. (2003). Shadows. Unlocking their secrets from Plato to our time. Vintage Books.

[6] Martin, A.J. (2017). The Evolution Underground: Burrows, Bunkers, and the Marvelous Subterranean World Beneath our Feet. Pegasus Books.

[7] Coccia, E. (2021). El jardín del mundo (The garden of the world), CENDEAC: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mxTQjBwuZRA&t=60s.

[8] Albert, B., Halle, F., & Mancuso, S. (2019). Trees. Thames & Hudson; Coccia, E. (2018). The Life of Plants: A Metaphysics of Mixture. Wiley; Coccia, E. (2021). Metamorphoses. Wiley; Leonardi, C., & Stagi, F. (2019). The Architecture of Trees. Princeton Architectural Press; Mattern, S. (2021). Tree Thinking. Places Journalhttps://doi.org/10.22269/210921

[9] Such as the ones developed by an architectural contest and experimental prototyping process put together by Barcelona’s City Council that I have been accompanying since the summer of 2023: https://bithabitat.barcelona/es/proyectos/sombra/

[10] Kite, S. (2017: 5). Shadow-makers: A cultural history of shadows in architecture. Bloomsbury Academic.

[11] Ludovico, M., Attilio, P. & Ettore, V. (Eds.) (2009). The Mediterranean Medina. Gangemi Editor.

[12] Turner, C. (Ed.) (2024). Tropical Modernism: Architecture and Independence. V&A Publishing.

[13] Kallipoliti, L. (2024). Histories of Ecological Design: An Unfinished Cyclopedia. Actar.

[14] Latour, B., & Weibel, P. (Eds.). (2020). Critical Zones: The Science and Politics of Landing on Earth. ZKM/MIT Press.

[15] Latour, B. (2018). Down to Earth: Politics in the New Climatic Regime . Polity; Latour, B. (2021). After Lockdown: A Metamorphosis. Polity.

[16] Horvath, T. (2009). The Discipline of Shadows. Conjunctions 53 , 293-311.

[17] Bauch, N., & Scott, E.E. (2012). The Los Angeles Urban Rangers: Actualizing Geographic Thought. Cultural Geographies 19 (3), 401-409; Kanouse, S. (2015). Critical Day Trips: Tourism and Land-Based Practice. In E.E. Scott & K. Swenson (2015). Critical landscapes: Art, space, politics (pp. 43-56). University of California Press.

[18] Crisis Cabinet of Political Fictions: https://www.gabinededecrisis.es/

[19] Hepach, M.G. & Lüder, C. (2023). Sensing Weather and Climate: Phenomenological and Ethnographic Approaches. Environment and Planning F 2 (3): 350–68.

[20] Aït-Touati, F., Arènes, A., & Grégoire, A. (2022). Terra Forma: A Book of Speculative Maps. MIT Press.

[21] Calvillo, N. (2023). Aeropolis: Queering Air in Toxicpolluted Worlds. Columbia Books on Architecture and the City; Fressoz, J.-B., & Locher, F. (2024). Chaos in the Heavens: The Forgotten History of Climate Change. Verse Books; Hsu, H. L. (2024). Air Conditioning. Bloomsbury; Parikka, J., & Dragona, D. (Eds.). (2022). Words of Weather: A glossary. Onassis Foundation; Starosielski, N. (2021). Media Hot & Cold. Duke University Press.

[22] In the same way that deserts are not empty either, a colonial representation commonly associated with the justification of the savage exploitation of arid lands: Henni, S. (Ed.) (2022). Deserts Are Not Empty. Columbia Books on Architecture and the City

[23] Glissant, E. (1997). For Opacity. In Poetics of Relation (pp.189-194). University of Michigan Press.

[24] Gissen, D. (2022). Disabling Environments. In The Architecture of Disability: Buildings, Cities, and Landscapes Beyond Access (pp. 95-114). Minnesota University Press.

[25] Keller, R. C. (2015). Fatal Isolation: The Devastating Paris Heat Wave of 2003. University of Chicago Press; Macktoom, S., Anwar, N.H., & Cross, J. (2023). Hot climates in urban South Asia: Negotiating the right to and the politics of shade at the everyday scale in Karachi. Urban Studieshttps://doi.org/10.1177/00420980231195204

[26] Bloch, S. (2019). Shade: An Urban Design Mandate. Places Journalhttps://doi.org/10.22269/190423 ; Davis, M. (1997) The radical politics of shade. Capitalism, Nature, Socialism 8(3): 35–39; Macktoom, S., Anwar, N.H., & Cross, J. (2023). Hot climates in urban South Asia: Negotiating the right to and the politics of shade at the everyday scale in Karachi. Urban Studieshttps://doi.org/10.1177/00420980231195204

[27] For an interesting example, see Boserman, C. (2023). Solar Drawings: On anthotypies and environmental affectivity. Re-visiones,13http://www.re-visiones.net/index.php/RE-VISIONES/article/view/529

[28] In the rich ethological sense explored by Despret, V. (2021). Living as a Bird. Wiley. A proposal that breaks with the idea of ​​territory as something that can be explained away either in functional and economic terms or as property, ownership and exploitable resources, claiming instead the need to describe it from multiple practices of inhabiting that constitute it and the arts of coexistence that they make possible. This idea is further developed by Latour, B. (2021). After Lockdown: A Metamorphosis. Polity. Latour’s proposal is to undertake a cartographic practice of territories different from the ideas of ‘blood and soil’ that have underpinned European traditionalisms and nationalisms. This is crucial, in his words, to orient oneself in the New Climatic Regime, which requires understanding ‘where we live’ and ‘what we live off’ by listing our affiliations.

Zine: Kit, Roles & Devices for the Department of Umbrology

How to fold the zine

Recommended citation: Criado, T.S. (2024). The City of Shades. Tarde, a handbook of minimal and irrellevant urban entanglements, 6. DOI: 10.17605/OSF.IO/JU6VM

Categories
animals atmosphere city-making ecologies events functional diversity & disability rights heat and shade more-than-human older people urban and personal devices

Prestar atención a las sombras urbanas: Zonas críticas de la habitabilidad contemporánea 

Presentación del taller La ciudad de las sombras: Etnografiar la habitabilidad urbana en tiempos de mutación climática (17-21 de junio de 2024 | Barcelona)

Nuestra cultura climática está en crisis. El calor extremo ya no es un evento externo, está entre nosotros, como un mal crónico con profundos efectos desiguales y devastadores.[1]

De manera peculiar para un país como el nuestro, acostumbrado al sol y al calor como un asunto estacional recurrente, esto nos sitúa ante una crisis en la que podemos creernos sobre-preparados. Pero verano tras verano, ola de calor tras ola de calor, los hábitos y prácticas heredados no acaban de funcionar: ya no basta con caminar a cubierto, llevar crema solar, beber mucho, vestirse ligero, bajar las persianas y esperar a que pase lo peor, porque lo peor está por llegar, en esas noches tórridas, tropicales e infernales, como las llaman nuestras colegas de la meteorología.

Las infraestructuras y modos de construcción modernos, que nos hacían sentir a la vanguardia, aparecen hoy irremediablemente problemáticos. Necesitamos un cambio radical. Diferentes organizaciones internacionales e intergubernamentales alertan desde hace tiempo que la respuesta al cambio climático debe partir de las ciudades:[2] asentamientos cada vez más poblados e infraestructuras complejas de cambiar desde los que necesitamos repensar la habitabilidad del planeta.

La mutación climática en curso nos sitúa ante el reto de configurar nuevas ideas urbanas de cuidado, protección o refugio, inventando formas plurales de habitar que protejan a quienes pudieran estar más expuestos o sufrir más sus efectos devastadores.[3] En ese sentido, vivimos un tiempo de urgencia y de búsqueda frenética de soluciones. Sin embargo, y ésta es mi propuesta, además de soluciones infraestructurales o “basadas en la naturaleza” tenemos ante nosotros una tarea importante: esto requiere, sobre todo, redescribir qué es lo urbano.

En situaciones de gran incertidumbre, donde cómo responder es un asunto a veces complicado de imaginar, quizá necesitemos entrenarnos a prestar atención a lo aparentemente irrelevante, pero crucial. Ese es el objeto primordial de este taller, que quiere poner el foco en las sombras: entidades aparentemente ínfimas, pero que articulan nuestra vida urbana y nuestras relaciones cotidianas con el sol y el calor.

Sin duda, no hay nada más convencional que la sombra. En tanto seres terráqueos todos tenemos una. Pero pensar la sombra urbana puede ser algo mucho más profundo de lo que parece, puesto que nos obliga a prestar atención de otra manera a nuestros entornos cotidianos. De hecho, ¿qué es la sombra, sino una relación cambiante en que entramos con el sol a medida que atraviesa nuestros hábitats a lo largo del día?

Edvard Munch (1911) The Sun / Solen

Con Copérnico y Galileo, la modernidad puso al Sol en el centro. Uno de los muchos efectos de ese giro heliocéntrico y su profunda transformación cosmológica es que solemos atribuir a la estrella que preside nuestro firmamento un rol benefactor, la capacidad de dar vida y de irradiarnos con su fuerza, pero esta apreciación regularmente positiva necesita un contrapunto: ¿qué hacer cuando nos daña o nos pone en riesgo, como en las condiciones atmosféricas del calor extremo o en la exposición solar que conduce al melanoma?[4]

La tradición filosófica moderna, pero también nuestras formas de expresión artística y folklore (con innumerables canciones infantiles alabando al sol), tiene dificultades para no tratar con prejuicio todo lo que queda por fuera de esas irradiaciones: una caricatura solarizada, tratada como lo arcaico, lo conservador, lo peligroso, lo turbio de la noche. Sin embargo, y esta es la hipótesis que quisiera compartir aquí, ¿y si nunca fuimos solares? ¿Y si para volver a respirar y pensar, guarecidos de su poder salvaje, a la sombra, necesitemos desplazar al sol del centro?

Esto no necesariamente quiere decir dejar de considerar al sol, ni resucitar la desconfianza platónica que nos condena a no ver más que las sombras proyectadas en las paredes de una cueva. El tipo de pensamiento cobijado que pudiéramos empezar a practicar tiene, más bien, en su centro a la sombra: ¿Y si la sombra no fuera la posibilidad de pensar en negativo, tomando las cosas por lo que no son, sino un modo de pensar protegido del sol abrasador? De hecho, como mostró ampliamente la pintura barroca, las sombras son centrales para nuestra percepción, para nuestro entendimiento del mundo, para nuestra supervivencia. [5]

Con esa clave, nuestra vida terrestre pudiera ser leída como una larga historia interespecífica de cómo los vivientes hemos aprendido a protegernos de su irradiación. Ese es uno de los argumentos más interesantes del trabajo del paleontólogo y geólogo Anthony J. Martin Evolution underground (la evolución bajo tierra), que retraza la importancia evolutiva de las madrigueras y arquitecturas del subsuelo para la supervivencia sobre la faz de la tierra de muchos animales desde tiempos inmemoriales, incluidos los seres humanos.[6]

Pero, yendo más allá, la misma atmósfera, logro inicial bacteriano, con su compleja circulación del aire, o más tarde en la historia de la tierra los mares y las riberas de los ríos o el tapiz irisado de las nubes y los bosques no son sino un gran sistema, con expresiones locales, de formas de captar, regular, disipar o bloquear los rayos del sol. En esta centralidad de la sombra no podemos olvidar a las plantas y su importante papel en hacer habitable nuestro planeta.

El filósofo Emanuele Coccia expresaba esto de forma muy poética en una reciente conferencia en el CENDEAC, titulada “El jardín del mundo”. En ella planteaba que lo que hoy llamamos Tierra no puede entenderse sino como consecución técnica de la vida o la labor de las plantas, cruciales para la producción de la atmósfera y la orografía, así como del oxígeno gracias al cual otros seres vivimos:

“la Tierra tiene un estatuto de artefacto… una producción cultural de todos los seres vivos que lo habitan y no sólo la precondición trascendental para la posibilidad de la vida. Gaia es hija de Flora. El sol es la muñeca cósmica de Flora.”[7]

¿Y qué hubiera sido de la terraformación de nuestro planeta a través de las plantas y, en particular los árboles, de no ser por su capacidad de transformar lo, producir hábitats o microclimas para que muchos animales pudiéramos comenzar a reptar más allá de los mares, cobijados del sol?[8]

De hecho, muchas de nuestras experiencias primordiales de sombra y protección del sol tienen que ver, de hecho, con los delicados entramados del follaje de distintos árboles y plantas. Pensar junto con los árboles nos permite aventurar otra hipótesis sobre la habitabilidad de nuestro planeta: ¿Y si la sombra fuera más importante de lo que nos hemos contado hasta ahora? Es más, a pesar de que suela ser considerada como un producto secundario del sol, su versión en negativo, ¿y si la sombra fuera condición misma de la habitabilidad en la tierra y, por ende, en nuestros entornos urbanos atribulados por la mutación climática?

Lo interesante es que, aunque la sombra sea una vieja conocida, la creciente preocupación ambiental ha hecho que administraciones y profesionales de todo tipo hayan comenzado a recuperar esta relación ambiental cotidiana largamente olvidada por las formas modernas de urbanización. Por esto mismo ha cobrado gran importancia en distintas soluciones técnicas para hacer frente al calor extremo del presente: planes municipales de sombras, itinerarios bioclimáticos o infraestructuras de sombreado.[9] Esto está requiriendo revitalizar saberes y técnicas antiguos, así como especular y crear nuevas soluciones para mitigar y adaptarnos ante el calor creciente.

Decir que no hemos sido solares, prestar atención a las sombras, significa también restaurar la violencia ejercida contra muchas tradiciones ancestrales del habitar por parte de los modernos, con su obsesión higienista por el aire limpio y las calles amplias, controladas y destinadas primordialmente al tránsito. Este urbanismo heliocéntrico fue la forma en que la Razón se hizo ciudad. Frente a ello, colocar la sombra en el centro es restituir su centralidad para la habitabilidad urbana, lo que nos permite admirar con otros ojos a la mal llamada arquitectura vernácula: buscando inspiración.

Sin embargo, decir que nunca hemos sido solares no es tirar la arquitectura modernista por la borda, sino comenzar a advertir formaciones urbanas modernistas para las que la sombra ha sido nuclear. Esto es, se trata de releer la arquitectura y el urbanismo no desde la luz, sino desde la centralidad de la sombra, como plantea el arquitecto Stephen Kite en su libro Shadow-makers, una historia cultural de las sombras como factor modelador de la arquitectura (“shaping factor in architecture”), tanto en las formas tradicionales como modernas.[10]

Aunque gran parte del libro de Kite está consagrado a la importancia de la sombra para definir las oquedades de edificios y espacios interiores, hay un capítulo maravilloso sobre la ciudad islámica mediterránea y de Oriente Próximo, porque ¿qué es la medina –– conglomerado formado por arquitecturas de adobe de cañón largo y usos de toldos o tejidos humedecidos –– sino una gran oda a la sombra como principio de habitabilidad urbana?[11]

Ladouali (2011) La casbah d’Alger

Pero existen también ejemplos interesantes de tratamientos urbanos de la sombra en diferentes tradiciones modernistas que se han desarrollado en climas cálidos y áridos, de lo que trata ampliamente una reciente exposición sobre el modernismo tropical en África y la India comisariada por Christopher Turner en el Victoria and Albert Museum de Londres.[12]

En Barcelona hay también una historia por reconstruir de las arquitecturas modernistas de la sombra, de entre las que destacan los dos umbráculos de los parques de la Ciutadella y Montjuic: estructuras siamesas, pero que funcionan por el principio inverso al invernadero; concebidas como parte del mismo impulso tenebroso que la historiadora de la arquitectura Lydia Kallipoliti denomina las gramáticas de la “aclimatización colonial”, que permitieron el frágil transporte o la relocalización masiva de plantas, animales y personas, para su comercio y exposición, en ocasiones comenzando una nueva vida problemática en el corazón de la metrópolis.[13]

Y, sin embargo, las soluciones del pasado, por problemáticas o interesantes que resulten, no puede ser la solución. Hemos entrado en un momento experimental, de gran estupor. Nuestras ciudades se han convertido en lo que el filósofo y antropólogo francés Bruno Latour llama “zonas críticas”: complejos territorios ignotos, donde los vivientes se están jugando la vida literalmente, pero también donde más se apresuran para seguir haciendo mundos vivibles, en su pluralidad irreductible.[14] El reto ante el que nos sitúa lo que Latour llama el “nuevo régimen climático” en estas zonas críticas urbanas es, por tanto, engendrar formas plurales de habitabilidad en un momento francamente complejo y problemático, sin garantías.[15]

Para responder tentativamente a este reto mayúsculo creo que necesitamos practicar una cultura experimental de la transformación urbana. Esto puede sonar paradójico, lo sé, porque estamos en un momento en el que sentimos que debemos correr para hacer algo. Pero debemos tener cuidado de no convertir esta prisa en un proyecto tecnocrático gobernado por expertos o por élites que le digan o le impongan al resto cómo vivir, como ya ocurrió en el periodo colonial. Si la vida es compleja, si la vida consiste en fabricar las condiciones generativas de hacer la tierra habitable, podemos sin duda advertir que están pasando cosas ciertamente tenebrosas, pero existe un gran peligro de confundir el diagnóstico con la solución, sobre todo cuando no sabemos cómo podremos vivir y con quién.

Precisamente en ese momento de urgencia, necesitamos más que nunca una cultura experimental para repensar la ciudad. Con esta prevención de la solución técnica no quiero decir que no sean importantes innumerables arreglos infraestructurales como pavimentos porosos y reflectantes, espacios de sombra para protegernos del sol de justicia y del efecto isla de calor, o dejar sitio para que la vegetación autóctona se desarrolle o que los animales vuelvan a ocupar un lugar central en las ciudades. Sin lugar a dudas todo esto es central, pero necesitamos ir más allá.

En un momento así, necesitamos también abordar la vida social y cultural de muchos fenómenos atmosféricos y climáticos, como las sombras, sean estas ya existentes o diseñadas. En un presente acalorado, donde la capacidad de cobijarnos del sol abrasador es un bien mal repartido, revitalizar sus saberes y prácticas generativas quizá sea crucial para reaprender a vivir como seres terráqueos. Para ello, quizá necesitemos, un ‘Departamento de Umbrología’ en cada uno de nuestros territorios. 

Este idea está inspirada en una propuesta desarrollada por el escritor Tim Horvath en su cuento corto The discipline of shadows, donde explora las complejas relaciones en un absurdo departamento universitario dedicado al estudio de la vida de las sombras, donde coexisten sin entenderse y generando muchas situaciones cómicas y de incomprensión supina físicos, dramaturgas del teatro de las sombras y filósofos platónicos.[16]

Sin embargo, en un momento absurdo como en el que nos encontramos, el taller es una invitación a co-crear y explorar cómo hacer existir un tipo de espacio inspirado por ese cuento, pero no como un departamento universitario. Más bien, tomando inspiración del trabajo de descripción e intervención artivista de colectivos como Los Angeles Urban Rangers[17] o los experimentos especulativos del Gabinete de Crisis de Ficciones Políticas,[18] quisiéramos imaginar un espacio de trabajo entregado al estudio de y la intervención en la vida urbana de las sombras: una umbrología que atienda tanto a los aspectos físicos y materiales como a las relaciones sociales y culturales.

Para hacerlo existir, a través de distintas actividades queremos entrenarnos a apreciar esta relación ambiental: dedicándonos al estudio etnográfico de las complejas relaciones entre el sol y los edificios, la calle o los árboles, así como el papel que distintos tipos de sombras pueden tener para distintas personas o colectivos y sus modos de sobrevivir al calor abrasador. Apelamos a la centralidad de la etnografía, como forma de indagar por la importancia que otorga al estudio de las prácticas, la sensorialidad y los modos de vida, porque creemos que necesitamos comenzar a entender estos fenómenos ambientales más allá de dos formas convencionales con que solemos hacerlos legibles y discutibles:[19]

  • Por un lado, las prácticas climatológicas y meteorológicas que ponen la temperatura y otras variables atmosféricas como la humedad en el centro, dejando en la sombra las dimensiones vividas o culturales, las formas de vida de las que surgen y las que hacen emerger, que permiten o dificultan distintos climas;
  • Por otro lado, las prácticas de legibilidad del espacio a vista de pájaro y en términos eucliedeanos, como hacen algunas plataformas digitales como ShadeMap o Shadowmap basadas en sistemas de información geográfica como OpenStreetMap que, a través de la geolocalización, permiten simular en nuestros dispositivos la inclinación del sol y las sombras que proyecta el entorno urbano.

Pero quizá para estudiar cómo volver a hacer habitables nuestras ciudades ante un calor creciente, necesitemos también aprender a describir con muchos más matices, tanto simbólicos como efímeros, atendiendo a otros saberes y formas de articular los problemas la nueva terra ignota en que se han convertido nuestras ciudades: fabricando otras cartografías experimentales que, como en el trabajo de Frédérique Aït-Touati, Alexandra Arènes y Axelle Grégoire Terra Forma, nos permitan traer a la centralidad nuestras implicaciones corporales en los climas urbanos que habitamos y la pluralidad de nuestras formas de habitarlos.[20]

La importancia del cuerpo vivido en la etnografía es central porque nos permite dejar de pensar las atmósferas o el clima y, más concretamente, el calor como res extensa: cosas externas desgajadas de nuestro hacer. Antes bien, como bien argumentan diferentes trabajos recientes en los ámbitos de la historia y los estudios sociales de la ciencia y la tecnología, el clima, las atmósferas y el calor son algo de lo que “participamos en su hacer”, por omisión y comisión, de formas más directas o más distantes, en nuestras prácticas cotidianas, encarnadas y mediadas por diferentes instrumentales técnicos, pero también por los modos en que consumimos y construimos ciudades o, dicho de otra manera, por las prácticas colectivas en las que estamos insertos: nuestra vestimenta, nuestros edificios, nuestros aparatos de aire acondicionado.[21]

Así, la sombra deja de ser un mero efecto natural y adquiere también propiedades culturales relacionales: porque no hay una sombra igual a otra y su singularidad depende de cómo la observemos, practiquemos e interroguemos. Esta sensibilidad me parece importante porque nos ayudaría a repoblar la sombra: no como la presentación en negativo de lo que se ve, algo vacío[22], sino como algo que posibilita y ha posibilitado la vida de muchos colectivos que buscan esconderse de la mirada cegadora de la luz, tanto del sol como del proyecto ilustrado.

La centralidad de la sombra como protectora de otras formas de vida resuena en el trabajo del pensador de la tradición radical negra caribeña Édouard Glissant, que en un contexto que todavía convive con la larga cola del esclavismo, defendió “el derecho a la opacidad” como condición de supervivencia para todas las formas de diferencia.[23] Pero también en el sentido más netamente ambiental del que habla el historiador de la arquitectura y activista de la discapacidad David Gissen.[24] Gissen defiende la necesidad de repensar las formas de urbanización desde muchas formas de vulnerabilidad corporal comúnmente apartadas de la centralidad del urbanismo –– las personas negras, mayores y la infancia, con enfermedades crónicas, diversas funcionales, etc. ––, por los considerables riesgos para la salud que el sol y el calor implican: como la de las personas mayores que sufren en silencio el “aislamiento fatal” de las olas de calor o la de la infinidad de cuerpos negros trabajan en exteriores, expuestos al calor y al sol abrasador.[25] Esto disputaría la centralidad del diseño del espacio público con sol abundante, haciendo crucial la sombra como principio de diseño urbano.

Pensando en los arreglos sociales y materiales de la sombra desde esta diversidad de cuerpos que la necesitan para su sostén cotidiano nos permite pensarla no sólo como “recurso cívico”, sino también como un “índice de desigualdad”: una infraestructura de la habitabilidad urbana central que debiera ser un mandato para los diseñadores urbanos, pero que aparece sometido a diferentes condiciones desiguales de acceso y negociación de la producción espacial, en la regulación de a quién se le permite que produzca o viva en la sombra y cómo, en diferentes contextos. [26]

Por tanto, partiendo de esa sensibilidad antropológica queremos: (i) trabajar en el diseño de pequeños materiales para realizar investigaciones de campo; y (ii) hacer un inventario de prácticas espaciales cotidianas, centrado en la relación que diferentes personas tienen con nuestras perpetuas compañeras como habitantes bajo el sol.[27] Experimentando y especulando con cómo poder hacer realidad diferentes Departamentos de Umbrología –– una confederación de entidades autónomas, singulares y auto-constituidas ––, queremos también liberar, imaginarnos y cultivar nuevas sensibilidades y responsabilidades urbanas sobre cómo hacer nuestras ciudades habitables.

Queremos hacernos responsables de describir, proteger y traer a la luz tenue muchos saberes y formas de inteligencia colectiva subterráneos que necesitan soportes opacos para florecer. Queremos, también, poner en discusión las múltiples necesidades de un gran número de actores singulares muchas veces desplazados de la centralidad urbana: no sólo quienes no pueden pagar la factura del aire acondicionado o quienes necesitan soportes para transformar sus viviendas y espacios de trabajo; hablamos, también, de quienes muchas veces no se contemplan como humanos o se nos aparecen como humanos de segunda, además de una gran cantidad de urbanitas no humanos en los que rara vez pensamos.

Para armar esta propuesta puede ser crucial poner a trabajar conjuntamente muy diferentes saberes, profesionales y colectivos, no sólo académicos ni institucionales, que tenemos la gran suerte de tener en esta sala. Esto nos permitirá, además de imaginar ese departamento que, esperemos, deje de ser una ficción de un cuento, hacer que esto ocurra a través de la generación de un proceso de intercambio mutuo y contaminaciones cruzadas.

Ante este reto, por tanto, necesitamos activamente volver a aprender a describir y dimensionar los problemas ante los que nos encontramos – también los problemas de las soluciones –, para así poder ensayar muchas propuestas para hacer posible la habitabilidad plural de nuestros entornos urbanos. Necesitamos, por tanto, cultivar la especulación urbana: ¡no la inmobiliaria! Me refiero a nuestra capacidad de pensar y repensar las muchas formas posibles que podría tener lo urbano para convertirlo de nuevo en habitable.

Explorando e inventando dispositivos de indagación urbana, bebiendo de sensibilidades y saberes de las artes, las humanidades y las ciencias queremos imaginar cómo equipar esos extraños profesionales de la umbrología, entre lo natural y lo cultural, con un interés particular por el análisis y la política de las sombras. Si tenemos éxito en estos experimentos sobre las formas en que entramos en contacto y describimos los mundos urbanos, haremos aparecer otra ciudad: la ciudad de las sombras, normalmente pasada por alto. Y nos entregaremos a entender su complejidad social, así como la multiplicidad de actores y ensamblajes que la constituyen; las formas de generar sombra, por parte de y para quiénes; así como las formas de socialidad que las sombras permiten como regiones o territorios:[28] atendiendo a sus temporalidades, sus ritmos y sus dramaturgias espaciales.

Ante la mutación climática que cambiará cómo viviremos en las ciudades, queremos, por tanto, contribuir a pensar otras formas posibles de habitabilidad urbana más allá de grandes soluciones de todo propósito y pensadas de forma tecnocrática. Es por ello que nuestra llamada a constituir departamentos de umbrología aparezca como un intento de abrir a reflexión colectiva los modos de respuesta urbana al cambio climático aprendiendo de un gran número de agentes urbanos: incentivando, estimulando y ayudando a sostener sus tejidos de saberes y prácticas en formas que bien pudieran exceder a las responsabilidades de las instituciones. Esa es la tarea de un ‘Departamento de Umbrología’ en nuestros territorios urbanos: salir de las sombras, para estudiar las sombras, trabajando “sobre las sombras, desde las sombras.”[29]


[1] Como lo muestran dos recientes informes de la European Environment Agency: EEA Report No 07/2022: Climate change as a threat to health and well-being in Europe: focus on heat and  infectious diseases, https://www.eea.europa.eu/publications/climate-change-impacts-on-health; EEA Report No 22/2018: Unequal exposure and unequal impacts: social vulnerability to air pollution, noise and extreme temperatures in Europe, https://www.eea.europa.eu/publications/unequal-exposure-and-unequal-impacts

[2] Un buen ejemplo de ello es la centralidad que la cuestión del calor y la respuesta ciudadana tiene en el reciente informe del IPCC de 2022, particularmente su capítulo 6 “Cities, settlements and key infrastructure”, https://www.ipcc.ch/report/ar6/wg2/; o las iniciativas de la Arsht-Rock Foundation formando y articulando “heat officers” en diferentes ciudades: https://onebillionresilient.org/project/chief-heat-officers/ o planteando nuevas formas de preparación ante los riesgos de las olas de calor, categorizándolas o nombrándolas: https://onebillionresilient.org/project/categorizing-and-naming-heat-waves/   

[3] Mi argumento bebe y se inspira profundamente en la obra del recientemente fallecido filósofo y antropólogo francés Bruno Latour y muchos de sus colaboradores. En su trabajo de la última década hay una noción central: “Nuevo Régimen Climático”, que remite a los problemas a los que nos ha arrojado un modo de vida particular, la producción y su dependencia de las energías fósiles. Un régimen destructivo que ha transformado nuestros entornos, moldeado nuestros saberes e instituciones políticas durante más de un siglo, poniendo en riesgo la habitabilidad del planeta. Al mismo tiempo, esta caracterización sugiere la posibilidad de su transformación, de un antiguo a un nuevo régimen: lo que supone la búsqueda de otros horizontes de sentido para engendrar formas plurales de habitabilidad en un momento francamente complejo y problemático, sin garantías. Para una introducción, véase Latour, B. (2017). Cara a cara con el planeta. Una nueva mirada sobre el cambio climático alejada de las posiciones apocalípticas. Siglo XXI.

[4] Para una mirada atenta a la pluralidad elemental de prácticas humanas y no humanas, o a la paradoja escalar de las múltiples configuraciones espaciales, corporales, temporales, histórico-culturales de nuestra omnipresente relación con el sol y la disipación de sus rayos o lo que pudiéramos llamar “solaridades” –– desde las formas infraestructurales vinculadas a la transición energética fotovoltaica a aquellas formas relacionadas con la catástrofe antropógena de la carbonificación de la atmósfera (donde el sol aparece como “the source of all withering and desiccation, a maker of monstrous heat”, p.18), por no olvidar de la centralidad planetaria de la fotosíntesis o los ciclos diurnos, o de su efecto en la producción de energías fósiles, por no hablar de nuestros sistemas de percepción visual –– véase la compilación de Howe, C., Diamanti, J., & Moore, A. (Eds.). (2023). Solarities: Elemental Encounters and Refractions. punctum books.

[5] El intento más detallado de restituir la centralidad de la sombra del que tengo conocimiento es el de Casati, R. (2003). Shadows. Unlocking their secrets from Plato to our time. Vintage Books.

[6] Martin, A. J. (2017). The Evolution Underground: Burrows, Bunkers, and the Marvelous Subterranean World Beneath our Feet. Pegasus Books.

[7] Coccia, E. (2021). El jardín del mundo, CENDEAC: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mxTQjBwuZRA&t=60s

[8]Albert, B., Halle, F., & Mancuso, S. (2019). Trees. Thames & Hudson; Coccia, E. (2017). La vida de las plantas: Una metafísica de la mixtura. Tipos Infames; Coccia, E. (2021). Metamorfosis. La fascinante continuidad de la vida. Siruela; Leonardi, C., & Stagi, F. (2022). La arquitectura de los árboles. Santa & Cole; Mattern, S. (2021). Tree Thinking. Places Journal, https://doi.org/10.22269/210921

[9] Como, por ejemplo, este concurso de prototipado del Ajuntament de Barcelona: https://bithabitat.barcelona/es/proyectos/sombra/

[10] Kite, S. (2017: 5). Shadow-makers: A cultural history of shadows in architecture. Bloomsbury Academic.

[11] Ludovico, M., Attilio, P. & Ettore, V. (Eds.) (2009). The Mediterranean Medina. Gangemi Editore.

[12] Turner, C. (Ed.) (2024). Tropical Modernism: Architecture and Independence. V&A Publishing.

[13] Kallipoliti, L. (2024). Histories of Ecological Design: An Unfinished Cyclopedia. Actar.

[14] Latour, B., & Weibel, P. (Eds.). (2020). Critical Zones: The Science and Politics of Landing on Earth. ZKM / MIT Press

[15]  Latour, B. (2019). Dónde aterrizar. Cómo orientarse en política. Taurus; Latour, B. (2021). ¿Dónde estoy? Una guía para habitar el planeta. Taurus.

[16] Horvath, T. (2009). The Discipline of Shadows. Conjunctions, 53, 293-311.

[17] Bauch, N., & Scott, E. E. (2012). The Los Angeles Urban Rangers: Actualizing Geographic Thought. Cultural Geographies, 19(3), 401-409; Kanouse, S. (2015). Critical Day Trips: Tourism and Land-Based Practice. In E. E. Scott  & K. Swenson (2015). Critical landscapes: Art, space, politics (pp. 43-56). University of California Press.

[18] Gabinete de Crisis de Ficciones Políticas: https://www.gabinetedecrisis.es/

[19] Hepach, M.G. & Lüder, C. (2023). Sensing Weather and Climate: Phenomenological and Ethnographic Approaches. Environment and Planning F 2 (3): 350–68.

[20] Aït-Touati, F., Arènes, A., & Grégoire, A. (2019). Terra Forma: Manuel de cartographies potentielles. Éditions B42.

[21] Calvillo, N. (2023). Aeropolis: Queering Air in Toxicpolluted Worlds. Columbia Books on Architecture and the City; Fressoz, J.-B., & Locher, F. (2024). Chaos in the Heavens: The Forgotten History of Climate Change. Verso Books; Hsu, H. L. (2024). Air Conditioning. Bloomsbury; Parikka, J., & Dragona, D. (Eds.). (2024). Palabras de tiempo y del clima: Un glosario. Bartlebooth; Starosielski, N. (2021). Media Hot & Cold. Duke University Press.

[22] De la misma manera que los desiertos tampoco están vacíos, representación colonial comúnmente asociada a la justificación de formas de explotación salvaje de tierras áridas:  Henni, S. (Ed.) (2022). Deserts Are Not Empty. Columbia Books on Architecture and the City

[23] Glissant, É. (2017). Por la opacidad. En Poéticas de la relación (pp.219-224). Universidad Nacional de Quilmes.

[24] Gissen, D. (2022). Disabling Environments. In The Architecture of Disability: Buildings, Cities, and Landscapes Beyond Access (pp. 95-114). Minnesota University Press.

[25] Keller, R. C. (2015). Fatal Isolation: The Devastating Paris Heat Wave of 2003. University of Chicago Press; Macktoom, S., Anwar, N.H., & Cross, J. (2023). Hot climates in urban South Asia: Negotiating the right to and the politics of shade at the everyday scale in Karachi. Urban Studies, https://doi.org/10.1177/00420980231195204

[26] Bloch, S. (2019). Shade: An Urban Design Mandate. Places Journal, https://doi.org/10.22269/190423; Macktoom, S., Anwar, N. H., & Cross, J. (2023). Hot climates in urban South Asia: Negotiating the right to and the politics of shade at the everyday scale in Karachi. Urban Studies, https://doi.org/10.1177/00420980231195204

[27] Para un ejemplo interesante, véase Boserman, C. (2023). Dibujos solares: Los caballos de espinacas Sobre antotipias y afectividad ambiental / Solar Drawings: On anthotypies and environmental affectivity. Re-visiones, 13. http://www.re-visiones.net/index.php/RE-VISIONES/article/view/529

[28] En el rico sentido etológico explorado por Despret, V. (2022). Habitar como un pájaro: Modos de hacer y de pensar los territorios. Cactus. Una propuesta que rompe con la idea del territorio como algo que pueda explicarse bien en términos funcionales y económicos o en términos de propiedad, posesión y recursos explotables, reivindicando más bien la necesidad de describirlo desde las múltiples prácticas del habitar que lo constituyen y las artes de la convivencia que hacen posible.

Esta idea es desarrollada por Latour, B. (2021: 90). ¿Dónde estoy? Una guía para habitar el planeta. Taurus, para proponer una cartografía de los territorios diferente de las ideas de “sangre y suelo” que han fundamentado los tradicionalismos y nacionalismos europeos. Esto es crucial, en sus palabras, para orientarse en el Nuevo Régimen Climático, que requiere comprender de “dónde vivimos” a la vez que “de qué vivimos” listando nuestras afiliaciones.

[29] Department of Umbrology: https://umbrology.org/

Categories
art atmosphere caring infrastructures ecologies ecologies of support events heat and shade objects of care and care practices politics and economy of care re-learning design uncommoning urban and personal devices

 La ciudad de las sombras: Etnografiar la habitabilidad urbana en tiempos de mutación climática

[Originalmente publicado en la web del Departamento de Umbrología]

Taller de co-creación comisariado por Tomás Criado (UOC) y Santiago Orrego (HU Berlin)

Organiza: CareNet-IN3, Universitat Oberta de Catalunya. 

En colaboración con Bit Habitat y la Oficina de Canvi Climàtic i Sostenibilitat (Ajuntament de Barcelona).

Requiere inscripción previa | Máximo 20 participantes | Se emite certificado de participación (1 ECTS) | Se llevará a cabo en su mayoría en castellano (en el trabajo informal no habrá problema en comunicarse en catalán e inglés)

[ES] La ciudad de las sombras: Etnografiar la habitabilidad urbana en tiempos de mutación climática (17-21 de junio de 2024 | Barcelona)

Este taller es una invitación a co-crear y explorar cómo hacer existir un Departamento de Umbrología, entregado al estudio de y la intervención en la vida urbana de las sombras: una umbrología que atienda tanto a los aspectos físicos y materiales como a las relaciones sociales y culturales de las sombras. Para hacerlo existir, a través de distintas actividades queremos entrenarnos a apreciar esta relación ambiental: dedicándonos al estudio etnográfico de las complejas relaciones entre el sol y los edificios, la calle o los árboles, así como el papel que distintos tipos de sombras pueden tener para distintas personas o colectivos y sus modos de sobrevivir al calor abrasador.

Actividad de las Setmanes d’Arquitectura 2024

[CAT] La ciutat de les ombres: Etnografiar l’habitabilitat urbana en temps de mutació climàtica (17-21 de juny de 2024 | Barcelona)

El taller és una invitació a co-crear i explorar com fer existir un Departament d’Umbrologia, lliurat a l’estudi de i la intervenció en la vida urbana de les ombres: una umbrologia que atengui tant els aspectes físics i materials com les relacions socials i culturals de les ombres. Per fer-ho existir, a través de diferents activitats volem entrenar-nos a apreciar aquesta relació ambiental: dedicant-nos a l’estudi etnogràfic de les complexes relacions entre el sol i els edificis, el carrer o els arbres, així com el paper que diferents tipus d’ombres poden tenir per diferents persones o col·lectius i les seves maneres de sobreviure a la calor abrasadora.

Activitat de les Setmanes d’Arquitectura 2024

[EN] The city of shades: Ethnography of urban habitability in times of climate mutation (June 17-21, 2024 | Barcelona)

The workshop is an invitation to co-create and explore how to bring into existence a Department of Umbrology, namely, a space devoted to the study of and intervention in the urban life of shades: an umbrology that addresses both the physical and material aspects as well as the social and cultural relationships. of the shadows. To make it exist, we want to train ourselves – by means of different activities – to appreciate this environmental relationship: dedicating ourselves to the ethnographic study of the complex relationships between the sun and buildings, the street or trees, as well as the role that different types of shadows can have for different people or groups and their ways of surviving the scorching heat.

Activity part of Setmanes d’Arquitectura 2024

***

Presentación

Diferentes paneles intergubernamentales alertan desde hace tiempo que la respuesta al cambio climático debe partir de las ciudades: asentamientos cada vez más poblados e infraestructuras complejas de cambiar desde los que necesitamos repensar la habitabilidad del planeta. La mutación climática en curso nos sitúa ante el reto de configurar nuevas ideas urbanas de cuidado, protección o refugio, que permitan formas plurales de habitar y que protejan a quienes pudieran estar más expuestos o sufrir más sus efectos devastadores. En ese sentido, vivimos un tiempo de urgencia y de búsqueda frenética de soluciones. Pero en situaciones de gran incertidumbre, donde cómo responder es un asunto a veces complicado de imaginar, quizá necesitemos entrenarnos a prestar atención a lo aparentemente irrelevante, pero crucial. Ese es el objeto primordial de este taller, que quiere poner el foco en las sombras: entidades aparentemente ínfimas, pero que articulan nuestra vida urbana y nuestras relaciones cotidianas con el sol y el calor.

Sin duda, no hay nada más convencional que la sombra. En tanto seres terráqueos todos tenemos una. Pero pensar la sombra urbana puede ser algo mucho más profundo, puesto que nos obliga a prestar atención de otra manera a nuestros entornos cotidianos. De hecho, ¿qué es la sombra, sino una relación cambiante en que entramos con el sol a medida que atraviesa nuestros hábitats a lo largo del día? Solemos atribuir al sol la capacidad de dar vida, pero ¿qué hacer cuando nos daña o nos pone en riesgo, como ocurre en condiciones atmosféricas de calor extremo? Con esa clave, nuestra vida terrestre pudiera ser leída como una larga historia interespecífica de cómo los vivientes hemos aprendido a protegernos de su irradiación. La misma atmósfera, con su compleja circulación del aire, los mares y las riberas de los ríos o el tapiz irisado de las nubes y los bosques no son sino un gran sistema, con expresiones locales, de formas de captar, regular, disipar o bloquear los rayos del sol. Pero, también, de producir sombra.

Aunque la sombra es una vieja conocida, la creciente preocupación ambiental ha hecho que administraciones y profesionales de todo tipo hayan comenzado a recuperar esta relación ambiental cotidiana. Es más, a pesar de que suela ser considerada como un producto secundario del sol, su versión en negativo, ¿y si la sombra fuera condición misma de la habitabilidad en la tierra y, por ende, en nuestros entornos urbanos? Por esto mismo ha cobrado gran importancia en distintas soluciones técnicas para hacer frente al calor extremo del presente: planes municipales de sombras, itinerarios bioclimáticos o infraestructuras de sombreado. Esto está requiriendo revitalizar saberes y técnicas antiguos, así como especular y crear nuevas soluciones para mitigar y adaptarnos ante el calor creciente.

En un momento así, necesitamos también abordar la vida social y cultural de las sombras, sean estas ya existentes o diseñadas. En un presente acalorado, donde la capacidad de cobijarnos del sol abrasador es un bien mal repartido, revitalizar sus saberes y prácticas generativas quizá sea crucial para reaprender a vivir como seres terráqueos. Para ello, quizá necesitemos, como sugiere el escritor Tim Horvath en su cuento The discipline of shadows, crear un ‘Departamento de Umbrología‘ en cada uno de nuestros territorios. 

El taller es una invitación a co-crear y explorar cómo hacer existir ese espacio, entregado al estudio de y la intervención en la vida urbana de las sombras: una umbrología que atienda tanto a los aspectos físicos y materiales como a las relaciones sociales y culturales de las sombras. Para hacerlo existir, a través de distintas actividades queremos entrenarnos a apreciar esta relación ambiental: dedicándonos al estudio etnográfico de las complejas relaciones entre el sol y los edificios, la calle o los árboles, así como el papel que distintos tipos de sombras pueden tener para distintas personas o colectivos y sus modos de sobrevivir al calor abrasador.

Partiendo de una sensibilidad antropológica queremos: (i) trabajar en el diseño de pequeños materiales para realizar investigaciones de campo; y (ii) hacer un inventario de prácticas espaciales cotidianas, centrado en la relación que diferentes personas tienen con nuestras perpetuas compañeras como habitantes bajo el sol. Así, haremos aparecer otra ciudad, la ciudad de las sombras, normalmente pasada por alto. Y nos entregaremos a entender su complejidad social, así como la multiplicidad de actores y ensamblajes que la constituyen: las formas de generar sombra, por parte de y para quiénes, así como las formas de socialidad que permiten, sus tiempos, sus ritmos y sus espacios.

Público

– El taller está especialmente dirigido a profesionales, investigadoras y estudiantes de grado, máster o doctorado de las artes, las ciencias sociales (antropología, geografía, estudios sociales de la ciencia y la tecnología, sociología), las humanidades, el diseño y la arquitectura, interesados por la etnografía y el estudio social de cuestiones urbanas o ambientales. 

– Mientras que un conocimiento de la práctica etnográfica es deseable, no se requiere conocimiento previo sobre diseño para el cambio climático o sobre la física de las sombras.

Objetivos

–   Abrir a reflexión colectiva los modos de respuesta urbana al cambio climático, colaborando con un proyecto de prototipado en curso, produciendo infraestructuras de sombra estacional (reto de sombreado efímero).

–   Generar un proceso de intercambio interdisciplinar sobre cómo indagar la ciudad en tiempos de cambio climático, prestando atención a las sombras como fenómeno social.

–   Inventar dispositivos de indagación urbana desde los que repensar las formas de relevancia de las artes, las humanidades y las ciencias en un momento donde priman las soluciones técnicas.

Programa

DÍA 1 | LUNES 17 DE JUNIO DE 2024 

Lugar: U0.3, Planta 0 Edifici U, Universitat Oberta de Catalunya (C. Perú 52) y diversos lugares cercanos de interés

9:30-10:00 Presentación del taller: La necesidad de un departamento de umbrología

10:00-11:00 Presentaciones inaugurales

  • Prestar atención a las sombras urbanas: Zonas críticas de la habitabilidad contemporánea (Tomás Criado, UOC)
  • Etnografiar urbanidades ínfimas en tiempos de mutación climática(Santiago Orrego, HU Berlin)

11:00-11:15 Pausa-café

11:15-11:45 Propuesta de trabajo por grupos y dinamización

11:45-13:30 Documentar sombras en contexto, a cargo de Carla Boserman (UCM): un paseo guiado por distintas áreas del Poblenou –– (1) parque central del Poblenou e inmediaciones de Ca l’Alier, (2) parque del Poblenou y playa de Bogatell, (3) c. de Marià Aguiló y (4) la superilla del Poblenou –– documentando en grupos configuraciones de sombras 

13:30-14:00 Puesta en común

DÍA 2 | MARTES 18 DE JUNIO DE 2024

Lugar: U0.3, Planta 0 Edifici U, Universitat Oberta de Catalunya (C. Perú 52)

9:30-12:30 Taller por grupos: Creación colaborativa de dispositivos para un departamento de umbrología.

Una sesión donde, recuperando las configuraciones estudiadas en el paseo guiado, entremos en el diseño de pequeños elementos de papel a partir de los que (1) analizar y tipificar configuraciones sociales de las sombras urbanas, (2) imaginar dispositivos de campo para futuras indagaciones, (3) testear sus posibilidades y (4) ponerlos en común para imaginar un departamento de umbrología.

12:30-14:00 Discusión del taller tras presentación de Isaac Marrero (UB), Etnografía multimodal y la política de la invención 

14:00-15:30 Pausa / comida

15:30-17:00 Presentación a cargo de Fernando Domínguez Rubio (UC San Diego), La ficción como método. Acompañan: Daniel López & Israel Rodríguez Giralt (UOC)

DÍA 3  | MIÉRCOLES 19 DE JUNIO DE 2024

Lugar: Pg. Marìtim de la Barceloneta, 32-34 y Pl. Leonardo da Vinci

9:30-14:00 El primer encargo del departamento de umbrología: La vida social de las infraestructuras de sombra efímera en el espacio público

  • Visita guiada a los sitios de testeo de los siguientes prototipos del reto de sombreado efímero en el espacio público (Oasi, ombra per a tothom + Mar d’ombres). 
  • Por grupos:
    • Puesta a prueba de los pequeños dispositivos etnográficos generados y discusión in situ de las adaptaciones necesarias para estudiar las configuraciones sociales que cada uno de estos prototipos implican: los usos y formas de socialidad que permiten, sus tiempos/ritmos y sus espacios. 
    •  Con los dispositivos generados se entrará en relación con los actores que transiten o habiten esos nuevos espacios de sombra, prestando atención a sus configuraciones de vulnerabilidad o exposición, así como a sus saberes y recursos. Tras cada visita se discutirán posibles cambios necesarios
DÍA 4 | JUEVES 20 DE JUNIO DE 2024

Lugar: Rambla de Badal, 113 + U0.3, Planta 0 Edifici U, Universitat Oberta de Catalunya (C. Perú 52)

9:30-11:30 El primer encargo del departamento de umbrología: La vida social de las infraestructuras de sombra efímera en el espacio público

  • Visita guiada al sitio de testeo del tercer prototipo del reto de sombreado efímero en el espacio público (A l’ombra del trencadís). 
  • En grupos:
    • Puesta a prueba de los pequeños dispositivos etnográficos generados y discusión in situ de las adaptaciones necesarias para estudiar las configuraciones sociales que cada uno de estos prototipos implican: los usos y formas de socialidad que permiten, sus tiempos/ritmos y sus espacios. 
    •  Con los dispositivos generados se entrará en relación con los actores que transiten o habiten esos nuevos espacios de sombra, prestando atención a sus configuraciones de vulnerabilidad o exposición, así como a sus saberes y recursos. Tras cada visita se discutirán posibles cambios necesarios

11:30-12:30 Desplazamiento

12:30-14:00 Puesta en común

14:00-15:30 Comida

15:30-17:00 Tarde de trabajo por grupos en los prototipos

DÍA 5 | VIERNES 21 DE JUNIO DE 2024

Lugar: Bit Habitat, Ca l’Alier (c. Pere IV 362)

9:30-10:30 Presentación a cargo de Francisco Martínez (Tampere University), Por un observatorio de sombras. Cómo entre-ver lo que ocurre en la oscuridad

10:30-10:45 Pausa

10:45-12:45 Equipar futuros departamentos de umbrología: Sesión de documentación colaborativa de los dispositivos generados en pequeños formatos como el fanzine (en colaboración con el projecte de micro-edición y publicación abierta pliegOS.net), con la idea de inspirar la creación de departamentos de umbrología en otros contextos.

12:45-13:00 Pausa

13:00-14:00 Relatoría final y discusión a cargo de Adolfo Estalella (UCM), La experimentación etnográfica y su archivo

Documentación

La documentación generada en el taller por las distintas personas participantes será archivada en abierto tanto en el Departamento de Umbrología como en xcol y Tarde

Financiación

Este taller está co-financiado conjuntamente por el Programa Nacional de Investigación Científica, Técnica y de Innovación de España 2021-2023 (RYC2021-033410-I) y por las Setmanes d’Arquitectura 2024 (Ajuntament de Barcelona / Fundació Mies van der Rohe)

**

El Departamento de Umbrología es una producción conjunta de xcol. An Ethnographic Inventory y Tarde, a handbook of minimal and irrelevant urban entanglements 

Categories
atmosphere ecologies ecologies of support events games inventory more-than-human open sourcing techniques & ways of doing urban and personal devices

A Publics’ Anthropology: Setting Up Ecologies of Collective Speculation

Thanks to the gracious invitation by Gabriele Alex (Uni Tübingen), last April 12, 2024 I had the chance to give an online lecture at the Civis (Europe’s Civic University Alliance) “Social Sciences Going Public – Research and Practice with, in and for the Society” Summer School 2024.

I took the occasion to share my vision for what I have been calling not Public Anthropology but, rather, A Publics’ Anthropology!

A Publics’ Anthropology: Setting up ecologies of collective speculation

What does it mean to undertake anthropological work in contemporary domains populated by a wide variety of ‘publics’, ranging from technical experts to affected communities? Publics are perhaps the main collective condition of knowledge production and circulation in the contemporary: not just as media-provoked entities–e.g. the ‘public sphere’ or scientific and professional societies, connected through ‘publications’–, but also the many uncertain and emergent collectives that gather in different degrees of involvement under issues of concern, using a variety of mediums. As I see it, an anthropology aware of its public dimension should not just be one engaging in public criticism, but also, and perhaps mainly, one transformed by the very relation to publics, developing different forms of engagement and exploring different aims and effects. In my work, I have been inspired to do this in activist design endeavours with different kinds of urban agents. To discuss the different forms a publics’ anthropology might entail, in this session I’ll share with you two recent projects working with municipal actors setting up ecologies of collective speculation: the game Waste What?, an interdisciplinary team production as part of studying activist circular economy projects in Berlin, searching to simulate the conundrums of these initiatives as well as provoke a reflection on their predicaments; and the Department of Umbrology, a collective speculative experiment equipping a proto-municipal division to inquire on the social dimensions of heat mitigation projects, in the hope that his might sensitise technical professionals to consider the social in the plural.

Categories
animals atmosphere concepts ecologies ecologies of support experimental collaborations functional diversity & disability rights more-than-human objects of care and care practices publications techniques & ways of doing urban and personal devices

CfP | Environ | mental urbanities

Edited by Patrick Bieler, Milena Bister and Tomás Criado

[Originally published here]

The recurrent everyday distress many of us live with in times of climate mutation seems to have unearthed a peculiar link that seemed long lost: between the mental and the environmental. More than a century ago, already Georg Simmel (1903) sought to discuss how a growing urban condition was making emerge new and unprecedented forms of mental life. He was far from being the only one concerned with how urban environments were affecting urban dwellers. In the last century, a plethora of experts of different kinds – architects, public health practitioners, social reformers, urban ecologists – have been trying to address urban milieus and atmospheres, so as to tackle a wide variety of environmental stressors, ranging from noises to air pollution, with green spaces and infrastructures becoming a central area of intervention deemed good ‘for the body and the mind’. In recent times, the green city movement is one prominent example of an increasingly recurring and intensified debate about the relevance of urban parks (Fitzgerald 2023).

One of the main features of the present environmental conditions is that things seem to be happening in distributed spatial formations that sometimes seem ‘all over the place.’ Interestingly, cultural studies of mental phenomena have for decades tried to dispute cognitive sciences’ abstruse interest in emplacing the mental in, say, the brain. For instance, Gregory Bateson (1971), drawing from cybernetic theory, notably attempted to ecologize the mind: the mental, thus, could thereon be conceptualized as a relational effect of the interaction of humans with their environments. In a famous example Bateson used, a blind person’s sense of touch was not just in their hand but also at the very tip of their cane, helping navigate the contours of a sidewalk. These attempts at ecologizing mental phenomena beyond the skin and the organism, have been considerably expanded recently by the work of another anthropologist, Tim Ingold (2000, 2011), who has proposed to move beyond a dualistic, binary understanding of mind and body by empirically focusing the relational co-constitution of organisms and environments in activities rather than stressing the embeddedness of an organism in a supposedly pre-existing environment.

Focusing on the processual emergence of both, organisms and environments, situating subjective, embodied experiences in their in-betweenness, overcoming the binary distinction of nature and nurture while refraining from biological as well as environmental determinism and particularly emphasizing how bodily processes are entangled with and permeated by environmental conditions resonates with recent interest of social science scholars in the production and phenomenology of atmospheres (Anderson 2009, Duff 2016, Winz 2018), the anthropological inquiry into biosocial relations (Ingold/Palsson 2013) as well as practice theoretical investigations on bodies as assemblages (Blackman, Mol 2002). Concepts such as “local biologies” (Lock 2001), “biological localities” (Fitzgerald et al. 2016), “health environment” (Seeberg et al. 2020) or “anthropo-zoo-genesis” (Despret 2004) have been proposed to describe the permeable entanglements of bodies and environments, the biological and the social (cf. Meloni et al. 2018).

Little attention, however, has been paid so far to the similarities and differences between the broader focus on biology/embodied experiences and ‘the mental’ – understood as ecological relationality – and the specificities of ‘the urban’ have only been slightly addressed in research with a particular focus on mental health questions (cf. Bister et al. 2016, Söderström 2019, Rose/Fitzgerald 2022). Paying attention to the mental in the environmental is not just important to address the convoluted sentiments we associate with ‘eco-anxiety’, but also to understand how the mind has been ecologized, in a different sense. For instance, notions of the mental are being everyday invoked to articulate many urban spaces: from the conventions of informal encounters that regulate how we greet to more infrastructural conditions such as, say, infographics (Halpern, 2018) in transportation systems. But, also, in an ecology of the mind so brutally dominated by psychopharmaceutical compounds (Rose 2018), how come we seldom discuss the environmental effects of drugs such as anxiolytics and antidepressants in our very cities?

This Special Issue wishes to articulate these interests and sensitivities through ethnographic inquiries that empirically ground connections between ‘mental’ phenomena and urban life. We want to ask: How might a biosocial agenda searching to ecologize the mind be relevant to discuss environmental conditions making dwellers feel, indeed, ‘all over the place’ as well? Conversely, what sort of environmental effects and relations are our ecologies of the mind producing? All in all, how can we imagine, describe, map and theorize the resulting ‘urban mentalities’ or ‘mentalistic cities’ without falling into the traps of idealism, holism, cultural essentialism and Cartesian dualism? What concepts, field devices and research designs might enable us to bring into dialogue experience-based approaches (cf. Söderström et al. 2016, Bieler et al. 2023, Dokumaci 2023, Bister 2023) with an inquiry of ecologies of expertise (Beck 2015) in which ‘mental experiences’ are taken up, translated, shaped and inscribed into the urban fabric?

We want to focus on ethnographic studies approaching dwellers attempting to render their habitats inhabitable, making emerge a wide variety of ecological relations between the mental and the environmental, be they regarding experiential matters, new or disrupted habits, conundrums in between the personal and the collective, the body and the infrastructural, and relations between humans and other-than-human beings. This is the research arena we wish to address as environ|mental urbanities, a denomination hopefully guiding us to grasp the sometimes elusive or ungraspable aspects of both mental and environmental practices and experiences in urban arenas. Hence pushing us to study how we can sense, describe and analyse what and how “bodies-in-action” (Niewöhner/Lock 2018) – or, more precisely: minds-and-environments-in-action, or environ-mental configurations – feel, touch, smell, navigate, encounter and thereby come into being (cf. Manning et al. 2022, Schillmeier 2023). Beyond the seemingly unmediated immersion of bodies in socio-material environments, environ|mental urbanities urge us to ethnographically inquire into the dynamic, shifting co-constitutive relations between subjective experiences, bodies, material environments, cultural practices, urban infrastructures, animals and other non-humans.

With more than half of the population of the planet now living in urban arenas of different kinds, but under the strain of daunting and unravelling environmental conditions, new urbanities seem to be developing that hold the mental and the environmental in tension. At a time when eco-anxieties are grabbing a hold of us, perhaps the time has come to re-analyse the environ-mental conditions of urban dwellers, and the role that the intertwinement of the mental and the environmental play in contemporary urban arenas. In this spirit, we invite contributions from anthropology, geography, sociology and adjacent disciplines which provide inspiring ethnographic case studies, tinkering and experimenting with methods and collaborative fieldwork and/or aim for situated concept work that allow to problematize ‘the environ|mental’ while simultaneously enriching our conceptualisation of ‘the urban’ beyond mere material or geographic locality and stage for cultural practices.

Deadline: Please submit abstracts of no more than 200 words, plus your institutional affiliation(s) and a short biography (a few lines) to patrick.bieler AT tum.de, milena.bister AT hu-berlin.de and tomcriado AT uoc.edu by April 29nd, 2024. If you have any questions, please write the three of us as well.

Process: We will notify acceptance by May 21st, 2024. Abstracts of the selected contributions will be proposed as a special issue to an international English-speaking multidisciplinary social sciences Journal. We aim for Open Access publishing. All contributors will meet online to pitch and discuss their abstracts in June 2024. First drafts will be discussed in a workshop in January 2025 (either in person or online). Final manuscripts will be due in March 2025.

Categories
accessibility caring infrastructures city-making functional diversity & disability rights publications techniques & ways of doing urban and personal devices

Naked Fieldnotes. A Rough Guide to Ethnographic Writing

Denielle Elliott & Matthew J. Wolf-Meyer have been for the last years working on a much-needed compilation on the art of fieldnotes, called Naked Fieldnotes. A Rough Guide to Ethnographic Writing. The volume has been recently published by Minnesota University Press.

In their words:

Unlocking the experience of conducting qualitative research, Naked Fieldnotes pairs fieldnotes based on observations, interviews, and other contemporary modes of recording research encounters with short, reflective essays, offering rich examples of how fieldnotes are shaped by research experiences. By granting access to these personal archives, the contributors unsettle taboos about the privacy of ethnographic writing and give scholars a diverse, multimodal approach to conceptualizing and doing ethnographic fieldwork.

As they expound in the introduction:

The practice of writing a fieldnote—­ what goes in, what is left out, who the audience is—­ is a difficult one to acquire, which is belied by the breadth of books and classes that purport to teach novice ethnographers to write fieldnotes. Like any writing, fieldnotes are the outcome of a learned sensibility that can be acquired only through the practice of writing […] This is one of the persistent challenges of teaching ethnographic methods, particularly when most of what students learn about ethnographic writing and fieldnotes is inferred from exemplary ethnographies. Students want prescriptive, generic expectations of what goes into a fieldnote and what a fieldnote should look like, thereby ensuring their writing of “good” fieldnotes; as an index of this sentiment, a few exceptional (p. x)

Growing out of the frustrations we have had as novice ethnographers—­ and that we have shared with our students—­ this collection of fieldnotes is intended to dispel the myths about the charismatic nature of fieldnotes and ethnographers by providing readers with a diversity of techniques, generic experiments, and objects and processes of ethnographic investigation so as to show how research and writing are always shaped by the sensibilities of researchers and the shapes of the ethnographic projects they are conducting. Fieldnotes are always experimental in their attempts to capture that experience. (p.xi)

I very much wish to thank them for their invitation to share one of mine, titled:

Munich, Blind Activism, Participatory Urban Design, November 2015

This note is part of my attempt at doing fieldwork with the Bavarian Association for the Blind and Partially Sighted (BBSB). It captures one of the organization’s in/accessibility explorations of a square in Munich on November 12, 2015. This took place after the square had already been finalized by the city administration, an anomaly in how to involve disabled people in design projects. As the blind activists already knew, the square presented many inaccessibility issues. Doing fieldwork in a very graphic-­intensive field like architecture requires one to think from the visual materials, so when I was handed the promotional brochure, including pictures and renderings, architectural diagrams, and an explanation of the urban intervention, I took a very fast decision: I put away my phone, which I used only to take my own pictures, mostly to remember the details they were talking about as well as the steps, and I opted to scribble on top of the brochure. I followed them for about three hours (from nine in the morning to noon) as they went about different aspects: the tactile differentiation of the creative pavements, the color differentiation of the pavements, and a few other things. My scribbled notes were rather nonlinear interjections, taken at different moments in the brochure. The pictures I took with my phone allowed me to have a sense of sequence afterward.

Recommended citation: Criado, T.S. (2024). Munich, blind activism, participatory urban design, November 2015. In D. Elliott & M. Wolf-Meyer (Eds.) Naked Fieldnotes: A Compendium of Raw and Unedited Ethnographic Research (pp. 59-70). Minnesota: Minnesota University Press | PDF

Categories
accessibility caring infrastructures more-than-human multimodal objects of care and care practices older people publications technical aids urban and personal devices

Ageing Cities > Zine

How are cities and urban designers responding to the challenge of population ageing? How can we as ethnographers understand the social and material transformations underway in their efforts to shape ‘ageing-friendly’ cities or cities ‘for all ages’? These are two of the leading research questions of our ethnographic study project “Ageing Cities” on which we worked together in the academic year 2021-2022.

Our main concern has been to explore the distinctive intergenerational design challenges of what some architects and urban planners are beginning to call “Late Life Urbanism” (check the video of the final presentation).

Our exploration included an excursion in April 2022 to Alicante, Benidorm and neighbouring urban enclaves in the Costa Blanca (Spain). The area is relevant as ageing bodies and practices have become, since the 1960s, a sort of vector of urbanisation in the region: developing into what some geographers call “the Pensioners’ Coast.”

Considering the intriguing history of migration of this region, with pensioners from all over Central and Northern Europe (but also from other regions of Spain) relocating there, the “Pensioners’ Coast” is an interesting experimental ground to witness what happens when older bodies take centre-stage. Over the course of seven eventful and exciting days we had the chance to explore how sensitised urban designers from the area respond to the intergenerational design challenges these bodies bring in different ways.

In a joint endeavour with STS-inspired architectural researchers from the Critical Pedagogies, Ecological Politics and Material Practices research group of the University of Alicante, the visit allowed us to explore different approaches to architectural practice where older people have more active roles in the design and management of ageing cities (from cooperative senior cohousing to inter- and multigenerational housing projects, as well as accessible public space infrastructures, ranging from sidewalks to beaches and public transportation).

With this Zine we wish to share some of our main reflections, learnings to engage ethnographically with late life urbanism in Costa Blanca (or should we say eng-age?). The Zine could be taken as a long thank you note and a memoir of our encounters with different initiatives. But we also see it as a relevant intergenerational gift of sorts, lent to future urban researchers on these topics.

Download

Lo-Res PDF | Hi-Res PDF

Editorial team

Adam Petráš, Anna Maria Schlotmann, Christine Maicher, Doreen Sauer, Erman Dinç, Maximilian Apel & Tomás Sánchez Criado

Design and typesetting

Maximilian Apel

CC BY NC ND November 2023 Institut für Europäische Ethnologie, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin

Categories
ecologies more-than-human urban and personal devices

Acte d’obertura de la Barcelona Innova Week i presentació dels projectes guanyadors del repte urbà d’ombratge efímer

Jornada > Barcelona Innova Week 2023

Dimarts, 14/11/2023

De 11.30 a 13.30 h. Ca l’Alier (Pere IV, 362, Barcelona)

Debat i reflexió al voltant de les oportunitats derivades de les transformacions urbanes, ja siguin evolutives, provisionals, efímeres o casuals. 

Programa*

  • 11.30-12.00 h Diàleg sobre la ciutat canviant i sorprenent. Elvira Dyangani Ose, Directora del MACBA i Laia Bonet, Primera Tinenta d’Alcaldia de l’Ajuntament de Barcelona. Modera Isabella Longo, directora de projectes de BIT Habitat.
  • 12.00-12.30 h Presentació dels projectes guanyadors del repte “Generació d’ombratge efímer a l’espai públic
    • Oasis, ombra per a tothom. Denvelops i Eurecat
    • Mar d’ombres. Batec
    • A l’ombra del trencadís. Arquitectura de contacte
  • 12.30-13.00 h Taula rodona: “L’oportunitat de la ciutat canviant”. Maria Buhigas, arquitecte en cap de l’Ajuntament de Barcelona, Marc Montlleó, Director de Medi Ambient i Eficiència Energètica de Barcelona Regional, Tomás Sánchez Criado, investigador sènior Ramón y Cajal en el grup de recerca CareNet-IN3 de la Universitat Oberta de Catalunya i Marina Cervera, directora Executiva de la Biennal Internacional de Paisatge. Modera Isabella Longo, directora de projectes de BIT Habitat.
  • 13.00-13.30 h Aperitiu – treball en xarxa

*Cal inscripció prèvia

Categories
accessibility caring infrastructures city-making ecologies ecologies of support ethics, politics and economy of care more-than-human older people publications urban and personal devices

Reassembling Ageing, Ecologising Care?

Upon Patrick Laviolette and Aleksandar Bošković’s invitation, I have written the Anthropological Journal of European Culture’s Editorial Response to Issue 32(1) on Materialities of Age & Ageing.

Reassembling Ageing, Ecologising Care?

Welfare states and market actors across the world have transformed what ageing as a process and being old as an embodied identity might be today, through a wide range of equipment, services and infrastructures. This ‘material’, when not ‘materialist’ drive is the object of analysis of the proposals gathered in AJEC‘s 32(1) special issue, which features different case studies aiming to foreground hitherto under-analysed ‘age-related matters’ to offer conceptual and ethnographic proposals to better understand what the editors call ‘landscapes of ageing and pressing gerontological concerns.’ The backbone of this special issue addresses how ‘material culture’ works in anthropology might be affected by what in other neighbouring disciplines like STS and Ageing studies is being addressed as a ‘socio-gerontechnological’ approach: that is, a joint attention to how ageing is a material process, as well as how materials inscribe or support peculiar meanings or ontologies of ageing.

Drawing from the recent experience of teaching the StudienprojektAgeing Cities: The Crisis of Welfare Infrastructures’ – and particularly reflecting on a field trip where we visited Benidorm and other ageing enclaves in the Costa Blanca (Alicante, Spain) – in my editorial response I wish to take issue with the need to widen this material agenda around ageing bodies and their situated enactments, thinking beyond classic ‘material culture’ objects of study – the home and everyday technologies – and venturing into wider and more convoluted urban arenas, with their variegated scales and material entities. These problematisations, I believe, would force us to provide less metaphorical uses of ecological vocabularies, hence addressing the challenges that these materialised ‘landscapes’ entail for to our conceptions and practices of care: perhaps pushing us to consider the very environmental effects of ageing-friendly modes inhabiting and terraforming, and the new forms of care these landscapes – deeply affecting, in turn, ageing processes — might need?

Recommended citation: Criado, T. S. (2023). Reassembling Ageing, Ecologising Care? (Editorial Response to Issue 32(1) on Materialities of Age & Ageing). Anthropological Journal of European Cultures32(2), v-xii | PDF

Categories
caring infrastructures city-making ecologies of support functional diversity & disability rights publications urban and personal devices

Learning with others about neurodiverse spatial practice > GeoAgenda “Field Trips as Pedagogical Devices”

For the most recent issue of GeoAgenda, the journal of the Swiss Association of Geography, Julio Paulos and Sven Daniel Wolfe have put together a collection of short interventions around the theme “Field Trips as Pedagogical Devices”

The main question they sought to explore was: What are the educational benefits of urban field trips? This special issue of GeoAgenda aims to answer this question through a series of stories, experiences and reflections.

As they suggest in their introduction (p.4):

Field trips are a common unit of study in geography curricula, and they are widely valued for the valuable hands-on learning experiences they provide. Nevertheless, they remain peripheral to most geography curricula. We don’t mean to suggest that field trips should be at the centre of teaching, but that a rethinking of teaching formats outside the classroom, and even within the classroom, is necessary to prepare students for the realities they will encounter once they graduate or leave academia. Field trips give students (and teachers) a vivid, first-hand understanding of (urban) environments. They allow for an exploration of the complexity, diversity, and multiplicities of urban life in a way that cannot be conveyed by classroom instruction alone.

This issue highlights these benefits, but also delves deeper into the issues of reflecting the standards of classroom teaching. In doing so, it calls for a more situated and experimental rethinking of university education.

Upon the gracious invitation of Julio (to whom I’d like to thank here), together with Micol Rispoli and Patrick Bieler we contribute to it with a short piece called:

Learning with others about neurodiverse spatial practice

In early 2020 Micol Rispoli (architect) and Tomás Criado (anthropologist) were working on a design experiment exploring how neurodiverse spatial practice might put architectural design practice in crisis. In previous months they had been engaging with a neurodivergent person and his family. They also had been revising standard architectural approaches to accessible design, in particular with neurodivergent people. But they felt they needed to discuss their predicaments with someone more experienced in these issues. Tomás, then, engaged his colleague Patrick Bieler (anthropologist), an experienced researcher on these matters, to join the conversation.

What follows is the account of a trip to the sights of Patrick’s fieldwork, where we tried to learn together what neurodiverse spatial practice might do to urban design.

Recommended citation: Rispoli, M.; Criado, T. & Bieler, P. (2023). Learning with others about neurodiverse spatial practice. GeoAgenda, 2023/2: 18-19 | PDF